A Lover of Books

Archive for the month “February, 2018”

Guest Post Number 1 by Anne Coates

My competition on Twitter last year for one author to feature on my blog for a whole year was so popular, I decided on a runner-up prize. The lovely Anne Coates was the winner and this year she is writing a series of six guest posts. Here’s Anne talking all about reading and reviewing.

 

The Two Rs – Reading and Reviewing

For most of my working life I have worked either as staff or freelance in publishing/journalism and a lot of my time has been spent, reading and assessing manuscripts, editing, abridging fiction and narrative non-fiction and judging competitions. So when it comes to reading for pleasure I love taking off my editor’s hat to immerse myself in another world.

Although I review some YA and parenting books on my website Parenting Without Tears and therefore receive advance copies, I usually buy novels even though I’m registered with Netgalley. I aim to support other authors by adding to their sales figures and posting a review on Amazon. As an author, I know how important reviews are! However I would rather not leave a review at all, if I didn’t like a book or had problems with it. Who am I to judge a book just because it doesn’t resonate with me? Just writing a book and getting it published it a major achievement and should be celebrated which is wonderful to see on Twitter.

One of the joys of Twitter for me has been finding new (or new to me) authors and getting to know bloggers. I fell in love with Mel Sheratt’s books and was thrilled when she invited me to a launch party in London some years ago. My first Twitter party and I met numerous people in real life who had previously just been names and faces. So many of those people have become friends…

Like most book lovers I have a pile of unread books. Some are patiently waiting their turn while others I have started but not finished for a variety of reasons. When I’m in the middle of writing a book, my reading time is limited so if after a few chapters I’m not engrossed, I tend to put the book aside, often seeking out authors I know whose writing I admire and enjoy.

What I love is being captivated by a narrative so all I want to do is read on – without interruption. The moments when my editor’s hat is left out in the hall are beyond compare but even with some of my favourite authors I get pulled up short by a mistake like someone wiping their nose on the sleeve of a coat they took off two pages before! Or a funeral being arranged two working days after a fatal traffic accident… But these are minor niggles really.

I am full of admiration for book bloggers who manage to read – and review – so many titles as well as having jobs and family commitments. It is obviously a real labour of love. And I feel honoured when anyone reviews one of my books or invites me to be featured on their blog (thank you Sonya!). A couple of years ago I wrote round-up of books I’d read and enjoyed. I was stunned to receive a DM from an author demanding to know why I hadn’t included one of her books. So I am always saddened – but not surprised – when I see that bloggers I know and respect have been subjected to abuse or bullying from writers and publishers.

That’s when I move away from social media and lose myself in a book.

 

About Anne Coates

For most of her working life in publishing, Anne has had a foot in both camps as a writer and an editor, moving from book publishing to magazines and then freelancing in both. Having edited both fiction and narrative non-fiction, Anne has also had short stories published in a variety of magazines including Bella and Candis and is the author of seven non-fiction books. Telling stories is Anne’s first love and nearly all her short fiction as well as Dancers in The Wind and Death’s Silent Judgement began with a real event followed by a ‘what if …’; That is also the case with the two prize-winning 99Fiction.net stories: Codewords and Eternal Love. Songs of Innocence will publish summer 2018.

 

Links

Dancers in the Wind
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dancers-Wind-gripping-thriller-Weybridge/dp/1911129635/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1486815984&sr=1-1

Death’s Silent Judgement
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deaths-Silent-Judgement-Hannah-Weybridge/dp/1911331353/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1487075630&sr=1-1&keywords=death%27s+silent+judgement

Cheque-Mate & Other Tales of the Unexpected
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cheque-Mate-Other-Tales-Unexpected-Coates-ebook/dp/B008G1FI5M/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1487075707&sr=1-1&keywords=Cheque+Mate+and+other+Tales+of+the+unexpected

Author website http://www.annecoatesauthor.com/

Twitter – @Anne_Coates1

Blog Tour – ‘Dead Ernest’ by Frances Garrood

‘Dead Ernest’ is being published as an eBook tomorrow the 1st March 2018 by Sapere Books.  It is also out in paperback.  I am absolutely thrilled to be kicking off this blog tour today along with two other bloggers.

I have an exclusive extract from the book for all of you to read, but first here’s what its about.

 

Book Blurb

No one had expected Ernest to die, least of all Ernest…

Ernest Bentley was a pillar of the community. But when he suddenly dies of a heart attack his wife Annie refuses to have the words ‘beloved husband’ added to his gravestone. Their son, Billy, is exasperated with his mother and worries about how she will cope on her own. Unwilling to take time out of his own busy schedule to take care of her, he enlists the services of the local vicar, Andrew, to keep an eye on her.

Before she knows what is happening, Annie finds herself telling Andrew things she has kept hidden for years. Dark secrets that had plagued her sixty-year marriage to Ernest. When Annie’s estranged granddaughter, Ophelia, turns up for a visit, the two bond over their mutual contempt for Billy and his controlling behaviour. But when Ophelia meets Andrew, the unhappily married vicar, things start to get very complicated…

What is the truth about Ernest? Why is Annie behaving so strangely now that he is dead? And how can Andrew reconcile his growing feelings for Ophelia with his respect for his marriage and his religion?

Spanning from the Second World War to the present day, Dead Ernest by Frances Garrood is a poignant, moving and, at times, very funny look at what really goes on behind closed doors in the ordinary lives of ordinary people.

 

Extract

CHAPTER ONE 

Dead Ernest

No one had expected Ernest to die, least of all Ernest. He prided himself on coming from tough, Yorkshire stock, and had often told Annie that he would easily outlive her. So, when he had his heart attack, Annie’s feelings were at first of surprise rather than anything else.

“Are you sure?” she asked the policewoman, who was making tea in the kitchen. (How odd that it was always the police who were sent to break bad news; almost as though dying in the street were an offence against the law). “Are you sure he’s dead?”

“Quite sure. I’m so sorry, dear.” The policewoman handed her the tea (much too sweet, and not hot enough) and put an arm around her shoulders. “It must be a terrible shock. Is there anyone you’d like us to contact?”

“Billy. My son Billy. You’ll need to contact him.”

Because, of course, Billy must be told. Strangely, Annie had rather wanted to keep the news to herself for a while; to taste it and think about it on her own before sharing it with anyone else. But Billy would think it odd if she didn’t tell him at once, and besides, there would be things that would need doing. Annie had only the vaguest idea of what those things were, but she was sure Billy would know how to deal with them. Billy was good at that sort of thing.

“How do you know it was a heart attack?” Annie asked. “How can they tell?”

“Well, they can’t tell. Not for certain. But that’s what it looks like. There’ll have to be a post-mortem, of course.”

“Ernest wouldn’t like that,” Annie said, remembering Ernest’s dislike of being touched and even greater dislike of anyone seeing him in a position of disadvantage. A post-mortem, she could see, was going to place him in a position of considerable disadvantage.

“It has to be done, dear. It’s the law. Because he didn’t die in hospital.” The policewoman poured herself a cup of tea, although Annie hadn’t invited her to have one. Death, it would seem, muddled up all the rules of normal behaviour.

Ernest would have hated dying in the street like that, with everyone watching. Dying in hospital would have been acceptable, with dignity and nurses and clean sheets. But then Annie might have had to sit with him while he was doing it, and she wasn’t sure she could have managed that. Perhaps, after all, it was a blessing that he had died in the street.

“Where was he?” she asked. “Where did Ernest die?”

“Outside the fish and chip shop.”

“Outside the fish and chip shop,” Annie repeated, surprised. It seemed such an odd place to die. She wondered what he had been doing there. The fish and chip shop was the wrong end of town for the barber’s, which was where Ernest was supposed to be, and he’d only just had his lunch, so he couldn’t have been hungry. But now she would never know. Nobody would ever know what Ernest was doing before he died outside the fish and chip shop.

Annie was aware of the policewoman watching her, waiting to see how she would behave. “What do people usually do?” she asked, suddenly interested.

“Do?” The policewoman looked bemused.

“Yes. When someone dies. You must see a lot of them. When you tell them, what do they do?”

“Everyone’s different of course,” said the policewoman carefully. “They cry, of course, and some people even scream. And sometimes they’re just shocked and quiet. Trying to understand what’s happened.”

“And what am I?”

“What are you?” The policewoman’s teacup paused, trembling, halfway to her lips.

“Yes. How would you say I was taking it?”

“I would say,” the teacup returned firmly to its saucer, “I would say that you were being very brave. Perhaps it hasn’t quite sunk in yet,” she added gently. “It’s a terrible shock for you.”

Was it? Was it really a terrible shock? A surprise, certainly, but a shock? Annie wished the policewoman would go away and let her think. She needed time to sort herself out; to get to grips with what had happened. Ernest was dead, and she didn’t feel anything much at all. Not sad, not happy, not anything. Was she normal? Was it okay to feel like this?

“Ernest is dead.” She tried the words to see what they felt like. “Ernest — is — dead. It sounds so strange.” She paused. “He had this little joke he used to tell: ‘Once upon a time there were two worms fighting in dead Ernest.’ I never thought it was funny, and Billy didn’t like it, but it always made Ernest laugh.”

The policewoman smiled.

“Did he have a sense of humour then, your Ernest?”

“Oh, I wouldn’t say that. Ernest only had the two jokes, and I’ve forgotten the other one.”

“Would you like another cup of tea?” the policewoman asked.

“No thank you. I think I’d like you to go now,” Annie said.

“But we can’t leave you here on your own. Not at a time like this. Is there a neighbour who might sit with you? Just until your son gets here.”

Annie thought of her neighbours. Of odd, secretive Mr Adams, a tiny man of indeterminate age who lived alone and who hoarded things. Annie had only once been inside his house and had been left with an impression of disturbing smells and what appeared to be wall-to-wall jumble and bric-a-brac. The piles were neat and appeared to be in some kind of order, but the impression was not welcoming. On the other side lived a young couple, with a frog-faced toddler who screamed a lot. Annie certainly didn’t want to involve them, and she quite definitely didn’t need the toddler.

“I don’t really have much to do with the neighbours.” She stood up. “I want to be by myself now. I don’t need anyone else.”

After the policewoman had gone, Annie locked and bolted the door. Then, because it was getting dark, she drew the curtains and turned on the gas fire. Ernest would be home any time now, and wanting his tea. Ernest was very particular about his tea. He always had it at six o’clock on the dot, the same time as he used to have his meal when he got home from work. Ernest liked routine and order, and because it was easier to do what Ernest wanted, Annie had always gone along with it. Yes. She must get Ernest’s tea ready. A nice piece of fish (it was Friday) and some mashed potatoes and cabbage. Annie thought it was odd to have cabbage with fish, but Ernest had read a book about green vegetables being particularly good for you, and recently he had insisted on having them with everything.

But Ernest is dead, she realised again. Ernest is dead. He isn’t coming home for his tea. The green-vegetable book came too late to save him. He won’t be coming home at all; not ever. His heavy tread on the gravel (a slight limp because of his bad hip), his key in the door, his voice calling her name as he hung up his coat and cap. None of these things would ever happen again. The coat and the cap were — where? At the hospital, presumably. And Ernest himself; where exactly was he? Lying somewhere, cold, waiting for the post-mortem. Annie shivered. At least she wouldn’t have to go and identify him. Billy would see to that. She couldn’t understand why anyone had to go and identify Ernest, when he’d been carrying his pension book.

~~~~~

‘Dead Ernest’ can be purchased in paperback from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dead-Ernest-behind-closed-doors/dp/1912546019/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1519756569&sr=8-1 

The eBook can be pre-ordered – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dead-Ernest-behind-closed-doors-ebook/dp/B077Y1R7PP/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1519756569&sr=8-1

 

About Frances Garrood

My main career was in nursing, but I also trained and worked for many years as a relationship counsellor with Relate. Widowed in 1992, I re-married and now live with my husband in Wiltshire, where I enjoy riding my horse in the beautiful Pewsey Vale, reading, writing, singing in our large church choir and keeping up with my grandchildren. I also write regularly to a prisoner on Texas Death Row and do local voluntary work with homeless and vulnerable adults.

I first started writing as a child; mainly poetry, but there was one horrific novel (mercifully, never finished) in which a woman gives birth to a hideously deformed child in a thunderstorm. While I was bringing up my four children, I began writing and selling short stories to magazines before the enforced immobility following a fractured spine gave me the time to tackle my first novel, Dead Ernest.

All my books are very strongly relationship-based. My writing has also been affected by my widowhood and my experiences with my Relate clients, and my books sometimes include issues of death and bereavement. Strangely (and not by design) they all seem to include pet animal funerals (not a subject which normally occupies my mind!).

 

PRAISE FOR FRANCES AND HER BOOKS

“Frances Garrood is a magnificent writer.” — thebookbag.co.uk

“Dead Ernest is remarkably well written, well constructed.” — Grumpy Old Bookworm

“Light-hearted, heartwarming and enjoyable.” —writers-online.co.uk

 

Links

Website – http://www.francesgarrood.com/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/FrancesGarroodAuthor/

 

Lynne Milford’s (aka LM Milford’s) Monthly Guest Post

I am delighted to welcome the lovely Lynne Milford aka LM Milford back to my blog.  Lynne was the winner of my competition to feature on my blog for a whole year.  Here is her second guest post.

 

Where did A Deadly Rejection come from?

When you’re starting out as a writer, one of the first pieces of advice you’re given is ‘write what you know’. There are several schools of thought on whether this is good advice or not – some say you can write about what you like as long as you’ve done the research. But I think when you’re first starting out, writing about something you know well means you can concentrate on learning how to write, without having to stop and research every step. That can come later, once you have writing experience.

In a former life, I was a local newspaper reporter for about 8 years. In that time I did some great jobs and some awful jobs. One of the not-quite-so-bad jobs was covering council meetings. I’d been to them all – planning, licensing, governance, for example. These meetings could be fascinating and dull in equal measures. Sometimes you had to dig to get a story from them, but there was always something there if you looked hard enough.

It was during a meeting of the ‘Innovation Panel’ that my brain started to stir.

The meeting had run on for two hours, with very little innovation taking place, when the councillors decided they’d better have a comfort break. My heart sank at the idea of yet more time wasted. Bear in mind that it was now after 8pm and I’d been working since 9am. In addition, I have to file what stories I could glean from the meeting before I could go to bed (to fill any spaces left in the next day’s edition). I had pages and pages of shorthand notes and began to review them to make writing up easier. Near me, as I sat at the desk kept for the press, was a small gaggle of councillors and officers deep in whispered conversation. As I picked up my pen to make a note in the margin by a useful quote, they all stopped talking, stared at me and then, as a group shuffled away to the back of the room.

Immediately my suspicious journalist brain lit up with ‘what were they talking about that they thought I’d overheard?’. It was probably nothing, but for the next few weeks I couldn’t shake that idea from my head, that if something was going on, what would they do to stop me from printing what they thought I’d overheard?

There would have been a lot of ways to do that without going to the extremes of what happens to Dan, the reporter in A Deadly Rejection, but I’ve always been somewhat over-dramatic about this type of thing – a good skill for a crime writer to have, don’t you think?

I can’t recall the moment I sat down to write the book, but it probably began to emerge over the next few weeks. It seems strange to look back now, when the book has been edited and changed so much, and think that without that one moment, that one reaction to a journalist, A Deadly Rejection might not have happened.

The book took over my life for many an evening, weekend, holiday for years but finally I’ve got it onto the virtual bookshelves and readers are enjoying it (most importantly).

I thank those councillors and officers for the inspiration. I promise that none of them is in the finished book, nor is the innovation panel. After all, who would believe that such a thing existed? You couldn’t make it up.

~~~~~

You can read Lynne’s first guest post about her writing journey here https://aloverofbooks.wordpress.com/2018/01/31/lynne-milfords-monthly-guest-post/

 

Book Blurb

How far would you go to get what you want?

Beneath the bustling, respectable exterior of the Kent town of Allensbury lies a world of corruption and greed.

When local news reporter Dan Sullivan scents a story in the local council, he begins to ask questions. But when his source dies in mysterious circumstances, Dan is implicated. He is quickly drawn into a world of lies, ambition and avarice as he fights to clear his name.

The more he digs, the more someone tries to stop the story from ever seeing the light of day.

Dan must decide what’s more important to him…the story, or his life.

 

Links

Book shortlink to Amazon http://ow.ly/57IG30fS5F5

Long link UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deadly-Rejection-would-what-want-ebook/dp/B0768WP1SB/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1507972626&sr=8-1&keywords=a+deadly+rejection

LM Milford’s blog – http://www.lmmilford.wordpress.com/

Twitter – @lmmilford

 

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ by Pankaj Giri

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ was self-published as an eBook by Pankaj Giri last November. Pankaj contacted me a while back to ask if I would review his novel. I would like to thank him both for sending me a copy of his book and for being really patient with me. I meant to review it much earlier but things got in the way.

It’s the autumn of 2012 and two people are about to find their lives totally turned upside down.

Still haunted by losing his brother at a young age, Soham has managed to establish a promising career in IT for himself in Bangalore. Fiona, after having had a difficult childhood, finds her life is finally taking a turn for the better. She has married her beloved and things are wonderful.

But when tragedy strikes them both yet again, their fundamentally fragile lives threaten to fall apart. Can Fiona and Soham overcome their grief and find some normality again?

I absolutely adored this book from start to finish. I found myself really wanting to savour it and so I took my time reading it. The writing was simply exquisite and the descriptions were just wonderful. Pankaj Giri has clearly given a lot of thought to this story.

The chapters are narrated by Sharon (Fiona’s mother), Fiona and Soham. The reader is given a good insight into their lives leading up to the individual tragedies. I warmed to the main characters instantly. I felt really bad for Soham who put himself through hell for years after his brother’s death.

It was really interesting learning about the different traditions; i.e. the festivals and what happens at funerals. I loved the description of the birch tree, how it loses all of its leaves year after year and yet it continues to stand there patiently. It waits for new leaves to grow and doesn’t give up hope. If only we could all be that patient and positive. This book really got me thinking and made me realise how short life really is and how you should make use of it. Material things are of course nice but loved ones are all the more important.

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ is a thought-provoking and emotional story about love and loss and how there can still be hope even in the darkest of moments. It gives a very strong message not to give up no matter what.

I really hope that Pankaj Giri writes more books. To not do so would surely be torture for his readers. I don’t normally compare authors with others, but I would say if you like Renita D’Silva’s books then you will hopefully enjoy this one.

I give this book 5 out of 5.

~~~~~

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ can be purchased from:-

Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fragile-Thread-Hope-emotional-inspirational-ebook/dp/B076ZGGNH8/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076ZGGNH8

 

Author Links

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/PankajGiriAuthor/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/_PankajGiri

 

Blog Tour – ‘Our Little Secret’ by Claudia Carroll

‘Our Little Secret’ was published as an eBook and in paperback on the 8th February 2018 by Avon Books.  I am absolutely thrilled to be taking part in this blog tour.  I have heard so much about this book and I really hope to read it one of these days.

I have an exclusive extract for all of you, but first here’s what the book is about.

 

Book Blurb

A sparkling story about what happens when you let someone into your life… but they turn out to want more than you’d bargained for!

Sarah Dee has the perfect life. A high-flying job in a law firm, a beautiful daughter and a house to die for. So how does she find herself looking in through the kitchen window while another woman enjoys it all?

When Sarah takes pity on a struggling young graduate who can’t get a job, she thinks she’s doing the right thing. She’s being kind, generous and helpful to others, as she always is. But as Sarah allows the younger woman into her home, her law firm and even her family, is there more to this pretty youngster than meets the eye? And could this be a good deed that goes further than expected?

Claudia Carroll does it again with a sparkling new novel about what happens when your life becomes up for grabs…

 

Extract

Liz

‘And now, I’d ask you all to raise your glasses to my beautiful bride. Stella, you make me happier than I ever could have dared to hope, and there’s not a day goes by that I don’t fall in love with you just a little bit more. So thank you, my love. Thank you for being my soulmate. Thank you for being my life partner throughout all these years of happily unmar­ried bliss.’

‘Yeah, because it’s all downhill from here you know!’ some smartarse from the back of the function room yelled out. I swiveled around to see who it was, but it was too packed to see properly.

‘Thank you for putting up with me,’ Tony, the groom went on, valiantly soldiering on with his speech, ‘and for being such a fantastic mum to our gorgeous kids all these years. Stella, you’re the glue that keeps our little family together, and I love you just as much, if not more than I did on the day we first met. I can’t tell you what joy it gives me to be able to say that in front of all our nearest and dearest. I love you from the bottom of a very full heart. And today Stella, you’ve made me the happiest man on earth. Ladies and gentlemen, will you please raise your glasses to my beautiful bride!’

There was a round of thunderous applause at that and not long after, the happy couple took to the floor for their first dance. Meanwhile, the rest of the guests, myself and Harry included, formed an impromptu circle around them, as bride and groom whirled away to their first dance.

Which was to There May Be Trouble Ahead, by Nat King Cole by the way, to gusts of giggles from the assembled throng. But this couple had already dealt with just about everything life can throw at any of us; the good, the bad and the ugly. What further trouble, we all wondered, might possibly lie ahead for them, that they hadn’t already come shining through?

Harry’s chunky hand slipped over mine as we stood side-by-side watching the bride and groom dance and I squeezed it back, really delighted that the day had gone off so well. Stella may have claimed to be a ‘Ryanair bride’ who insisted on no fuss or frills, but still. This was her wedding day and I knew she wanted it all to run smoothly. And by and large, it had.

It was coming up to 9pm but, amazingly, the sun had shone all day and it was still bright enough that smokers and anyone who wanted a gulp of fresh air could drift in and out to the gardens through the open terrace doors, without fear of getting hypothermia. We were in the gorgeous, uber-luxurious Rathsallagh House for the wedding and the staff had really excelled themselves. The banqueting hall where the reception dinner was held had been lovingly decorated in delicate shades of lavender and lilac, all to compliment Stella’s bridal colours.

~~~~~

Has the extract left you needing to read this book?  If so, it’s available to buy from Amazon UK:-

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Our-Little-Secret-Claudia-Carroll-ebook/dp/B073YKLMY2/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1519493725&sr=1-1

 

About Claudia Carroll

Claudia Carroll is a number one bestselling author in Ireland and a top ten bestseller in the UK, selling over 670,000 copies of her paperbacks alone. She was born in Dublin where she still lives and where she has worked extensively both as a theatre and stage actress. She now writes full-time. Her 2013 novel Me and You was shortlisted for the Bord Gais Popular Choice Irish Book Award.

 

Links

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Claudiacarrollbooks/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/carrollclaudia

Goodreads – https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16566.Claudia_Carroll

 

Cover Reveal – ‘Abel’s Revenge’ by Ross Greenwood

This is such an exciting day.  You might be wondering why and the reason is this.  ‘Abel’s Revenge’ is Ross Greenwood’s brand new book and it is being published as an eBook on the 25th March 2018.  Today, along with a number of other bloggers I am helping to reveal the cover and I can tell you now that it is fab.

So, are you ready to see the cover?  I won’t keep you waiting any longer.  Feast your eyes on this little beauty…..

 

Book Blurb

This is a story about a city. As with all others, it’s a place of violence. There are murderers, and they live among us.

This is also a tale about a couple — sometimes friends, occasionally lovers, but always partners. Dan and Olivia are fighting modern battles; the ones parents have over a lack of money, time or peace.

An escalating serial killer terrifies the streets and homes. The body count rises as their relationship crumbles. Society reveals its dark side, and no one is safe. Dan and Olivia experience this first-hand as danger closes in.

Will Abel’s reign of terror ever end?

Who will live and who will die?

~~~~~

‘Abel’s Revenge’ can be pre-ordered from:-

Amazon UK – http://bit.ly/AbelsRevenge-RossGreenwood-AmazonUK

Amazon US – http://bit.ly/AbelsRevenge-RossGreenwood-AmazonUS

 

About Ross Greenwood

Ross Greenwood was born in 1973 in Peterborough and lived there until he was 20, attending The King’s School in the city. He then began a rather nomadic existence, living and working all over the country and various parts of the world.

Ross found himself returning to Peterborough many times over the years, usually, so he says “when things had gone wrong.” It was on one of these occasions that he met his partner about 100 metres from his back door whilst walking a dog. Two children swiftly followed. And, according to Ross, he is “still a little stunned by the pace of it now.”

Lazy Blood book was started a long time ago but parenthood and then four years as a prison officer got in the way. Ironically it was the four a.m. feed which gave the author the opportunity to finish the book as unable to get back to sleep he completed it in the early morning hours.

Ross Greenwood’s second book, The Boy Inside, was picked up by Bloodhound Books, and in September 2017, Fifty Years of Fear was published. All his books are thought provoking, and told with a sense of humour.

Ross Greenwood hopes you enjoy reading them.

 

Author Links

Website – www.rossgreenwoodauthor.com

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/RossGreenwoodAuthor/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/greenwoodross

 

Other Books by Ross Greenwood

Lazy Blood (Sept. 2016) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2pqxLfo
The Boy Inside (Febr 2017) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2uuGWRQ
Fifty Years of Fear (Sept.2017) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2DY1TWB

~~~~~

Blog Tour

There will be a blog tour starting on publication day which has been organised by the wonderful Caroline Vincent of Bits about Books.

Blog Tour – ‘Blue Night’ by Simone Buchholz

‘Blue Night’ is the first book in a brand new series. It was published as an eBook last December by Orenda Books and is out on the 28th February in paperback. Today it is my turn on this blog tour along with another blogger. I would like to thank Anne Cater of Random Things Through My Letterbox for inviting me to take part. Thanks also to Anne and Karen Sullivan for my review copy of this book.

After convicting a superior for corruption and shooting off a gangster’s crown jewels, Chastity Riley’s career as a hard-bitten state prosecutor has taken a nose dive. She has been transferred to the tedium of witness protection to prevent her making any more trouble. However, when she is assigned to the case of an anonymous man lying under police guard in hospital, with almost every bone in his body broken and a finger cut off and refusing to speak in anything other than riddles, Chastity’s instinct for the big, exciting case kicks in.

‘Blue Night’ has been translated by Rachel Ward. Set in Hamburg this is a gritty and exciting story. It has been well written with some catchy chapter headings. I really like the author’s way with words and her descriptions. At the end of each chapter the reader gets to meet several different characters and finds what has been going on through them, leading up to current events. It certainly makes for interesting reading.

When Chastity Riley is given the case of a man who has been admitted to hospital having had his bones broken and a finger cut off, she doesn’t know exactly what she is taking on. He is giving virtually nothing away and Chastity finds that she has her work cut out, but then he does start talking a bit and gives her a clue as to what’s going on. Chastity finds herself being led her into the dark world of drugs and what she sees isn’t exactly pretty. With the help of Wieczorkowski, a narcotics officer, and her colleagues they will hopefully be able to stop something big.

I liked Chastity from the very beginning and I think we all could do with someone like her in our lives. She’s not had it easy and it’s obvious that she has suffered a lot in the past, but she’s not given up. She’s got a lot of fight in her and is one gutsy lady.

A promising start to a new series, I am looking forward to reading more by this author and finding out what Chastity gets involved in next.

I give this book 4 out of 5.

~~~~~

‘Blue Night’ can be purchased from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Night-Chastity-Riley-Simone-Buchholz-ebook/dp/B075YPPHB3/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519193051&sr=1-1&keywords=blue+night+by+simone

 

About Simone Buchholz

Simone Buchholz was born in Hanau in 1972. At university, she studied Philosophy and Literature, worked as a waitress and a columnist, and trained to be a journalist at the prestigious Henri-Nannen-School in Hamburg. In 2016, Simone Buchholz was awarded the Crime Cologne Award as well as runner-up for the German Crime Fiction Prize for Blue Night, which was number one on the KrimiZEIT Best of Crime List for months. She lives in Sankt Pauli, in the heart of Hamburg, with her husband and son.

Website –  http://simonebuchholz.com/

Guest Post by Angelena Boden

I am delighted to welcome the lovely Angelena Boden back to my blog.  Her latest novel, ‘The Future Can’t Wait’ was published last November in paperback and as an eBook by Urbane Publications.  Angelena has written a very interesting guest post about finding balance in her writing life.  I hope you enjoy reading it.

 

Finding balance in my writing life 

When I semi-retired from my training consultancy three years ago, it was with the intention of writing a novel. I made the decision to, partly fulfil a long held ambition like many writers, but also to keep a promise to my English teacher who wrote on my school report, Angelena writes graphically about the dark side of human nature. She’d make a good novelist. I was about to sit my O’ Levels at the time. It was 1972.

I enjoyed the writing process so much that I carried on and published a second book, The Future Can’t Wait with the forward thinking Urbane Publications.  What has given me the most pleasure is the number of online associates I’ve made.

Even though I’m fortunate to have the resources and support to write full time and indulge my hobbies, take courses and travel, I’m choosing to leave my self-imposed isolation and re-join society. Not only do I need the stimulation of other people for my mental health, I am thirsty for a stream of fresh perspectives that, as a character writer, come from observing the behaviour of others first hand.  I’ve been asked if my career as an author is now over. That would be like asking if I’m giving up tea.  Unthinkable.

This year will see me organising a new but limited schedule of workshops and coaching sessions for people who are going through major life transitions and need help in making sense of them. As a transpersonal coach with a professional background in psychology and training, I work with people to harness their Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and Spiritual Intelligence (SQ) so as to tap into the deeper meanings in their lives.

This helps to widen perspectives on issues which block progress.   I’ve already had a company express interest in adding a spiritual dimension to their training programme so it could be a big thing in years to come.

Being out and about will mean greater opportunities to reach potential new readers for my books. It’s when people get to know authors on a face to face basis that they build up a relationship and want to buy a book or two. My hairdresser, a couple I met in the park, my dentist, a few dog walkers have all downloaded my novels because of a casual conversation about what I do. No hard sell. I’m uncomfortable with pushing my work in people’s faces whether in person or online so being able to chat about stuff on great blogs like yours is an ideal platform for me.

I shall continue to offer lots of free downloads as in my new Little Book Series which can be found on my website. These are condensed observations (about 6,000 words) about popular topics.  I am sure my blogging content will grow once I am back out there as I tend to be a prolific writer who loves to give back to those kind  people who support me.

I’ve enjoyed my three years in my writing room, walking in the Malvern Hills where I live and setting my own pace after the years of frenetic travel. My training and experience assures me that when we reach sixty, we reassess life on the approach to the final lap of our journey. It’s a salutary thought. We undergo some major internal transformations in identity which can cause upset and confusion so it’s natural to want to cling to the past.  My goal is to help people manage these transitions through coaching and writing.

On a final note, I’m editing my third book, which is set in my home town in Derbyshire. The lead character, Edna Reid, ponders the meaning of life and death and decides to set up a safe space in her café for the locals to talk about their feelings and fears. It’s not at all morbid!

My editor described it as a “humourous, thought-provoking and moving account of a strong, elderly woman’s struggle to make peace with grief and mortality”.

Thank you Sonya for hosting this post and to everyone who supports my work. You give me the encouragement to keep going. We all need that from time to time.

 

About Angelena Boden

Angelena Boden (M.Soc.Sc PGDE) has spent thirty-five years as an international training consultant, specialising in behavioural management and conflict resolution. She trained in Transactional Analysis, the psychology of communication and behaviour, her preferred tool for counselling and coaching.

She is the author of The Cruelty of Lambs, a novel about psychological domestic abuse.

Her new book, The Future Can’t Wait tackles the issue of mother-daughter estrangement and addiction to psychics.

Both books are published by Urbane Publications.

 

Links

‘The Cruelty of Lambs’ can be purchased from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cruelty-Lambs-Angelena-Boden/dp/191112966X

 ‘The Future Can’t Wait’ can be purchased from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Cant-Wait-Angelena-Boden/dp/191158314X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499170184&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Future+Can%27t+Wait

Website: angelenaboden.com

Twitter: @angelenaboden

Angelena Boden can be contacted by email at bodenangelena@gmail.com

 

Blog Tour – ‘The Betrayal’ by Anne Allen

‘The Betrayal’, Volume 6 of the Guernsey Novels was published in paperback and as an eBook on the 20th October 2017 by Sarnia Press. I was invited to take part in this blog tour by Rachel Gilbey of Rachel’s Random Resources. I would like to thank both Rachel and Anne Allen for my review copy of this book.

This story is set mostly in Guernsey in the 1940s and 2011.

In 1940 Teresa Bichard and her baby were sent by her beloved husband, Leo to England for their own safety. The Germans were getting closer to Guernsey and could invade at any time. A couple of years later Leo, who was of Jewish descent, was betrayed to the Germans and sent to a concentration camp. Sadly, he never returned home.

When Teresa returned to Guernsey in 1945 she found out that Leo did not survive. The family’s valuable art collection, including a Renoir, was missing. Heartbroken, she returned to England.

It’s 2011 and Nigel and his twin Fiona buy a long-established antique shop in Guernsey and during a refit, find a hidden stash of paintings, including what appears to be a Renoir. Days later, Fiona finds Nigel dead, an apparent suicide. Refusing to accept the verdict, a distraught Fiona employs a detective to help her discover the truth.

Searching for the true owner of the painting brings Fiona close to someone who opens a chink in her broken heart. Can she answer some crucial questions before laying her brother’s ghost to rest?

I’m so glad to have been given the opportunity to take part in this blog tour. I have read and reviewed a couple of Anne Allen’s books previously which I remember really enjoying. It feels so nice to be finally reunited with this series. This book can be read as a standalone without spoiling any pleasure.

I thought ‘The Betrayal’ was absolutely fabulous. It was such an interesting read. I really like the author’s style of writing and her descriptions of Guernsey were wonderful.  It sounds so beautiful, a place to get lost in, a sanctuary. There’s also lots of mention of food throughout the story. Always a good thing even though it did make me feel a bit hungry. At the front of the book there is a map of Guernsey and the surrounding islands which is useful.

I liked the way the story switched back and forth between the present and the past. I really felt for poor Leo and what happened to him. I had a pretty good idea who the betrayer was. So very tragic. There were a number of lovely and genuine characters in this book. I warmed to Fiona straightaway and I loved her friends, especially Louisa and Paul. I also liked Michael a lot.

I really hope there are going to be many more Guernsey novels.

I give this book 5 out of 5.

~~~~~

Like the sound of this book?  You can purchase it from Amazon UK:- 

http://mybook.to/TheBetrayal

A Triple Celebration and a Price Reduction!

For this week only, until 18th February, the price of books 2-6 of The Guernsey Novels is only £1.99/$2.99, with book 1, ‘Dangerous Waters, remaining at 99p/99c

This is in celebration of Anne Allen’s birthday, the 6th anniversary of the publication of ‘Dangerous Waters’ and the recent publication of book 6, ‘The Betrayal’.

 

Rafflecopter Giveaway

To coincide with this blog tour a competition is being run.  The prize is 1 x signed paperback copy of ‘The Betrayal’.  To enter, click on this link – http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/33c6949460/

This competition is open internationally.

 

About Anne Allen

Anne Allen lives in Devon, by her beloved sea. She has three children, and her daughter and two grandchildren live nearby. Her restless spirit has meant a number of moves which included Spain for a couple of years. The longest stay was in Guernsey for nearly fourteen years after falling in love with the island and the people. She contrived to leave one son behind to ensure a valid reason for frequent returns.

By profession, Anne was a psychotherapist, but long had the itch to write. Now a full-time writer, she has written The Guernsey Novels, six having been published and the seventh, The Inheritance, is due out in 2018.

 

Links

Website – http://www.anneallen.co.uk

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Anne-Allen-Author-176883759173475/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/AnneAllen21

Guest Post by Andrea Jutson

I would like to welcome Andrea Jutson to my blog.  Her book, ‘Senseless’, the first volume of The James Paxton Mysteries was published in paperback and as an eBook last month by Williams & Whiting.  Andrea has written a guest post which I hope you all enjoy.

~~~~~

Pick Your Poison – The Many Flavours of the Crime Novel

What I love about reading – and writing – crime is that, as all crime readers know, there’s no such thing as “the crime novel”. When I set out to write my first crime novel, Senseless, choosing my genre wasn’t as simple as going ‘I’ll write a book with murders in it’. I had to fight really hard to keep my writing and my characters on track, with just the right level of humour to keep it from being the sort of dry police procedural I’d grown tired of, but not so funny it headed into screwball territory. I spent some time reading the kind of authors I aspired to be, and thinking: “What would Mark Billingham sound like here?” Or conversely, having to murder my own best lines, in agony, because the punchlines ruined the punch.

It made me really think about how much crime, as a supposedly single genre, really encompasses all sorts of different conventions that each require their own skills. There’s cosy, there’s Sherlock Holmes-style detective, there’s the eight-minute hardboiled, and six-minute with a few soft bits, there’s darkly funny, the serial killer thriller, there’s police procedural, spy novel, historical – and that has as many sub-genres again – screwball caper, psychological thriller, supernatural…the list goes on. Despite all the genre-blending and bending that goes on, the hardest thing for me as a new writer doing a serial killer thriller with elements of the supernatural was staying on my side of the road. Or even finding the road.

Oddly, the amount of detail I spent describing people’s meals also seemed to come highly loaded – too much detail, and it sounded like a cosy American novel where everyone always seems to eat delicious meals of lobster or linguine with garlic-buttered dinner rolls hot from the oven and pie for dessert, but too little and it came out Lee Child. This seems like a pretty firm rule, and yet while Canadian author Louise Penny is always describing her characters’ gourmet meals – so far, so cosy – the books are somehow psychological studies. Likewise, Andrea Camilleri’s novels can spend chapters on the seafood and pasta dishes Inspector Montalbano stuffs in, and they’re hilarious, but they’re also as political as all hell. The very best crime novelists – hello, Stuart MacBride – can play very close to the edge, regularly veering off into farce while still managing to shock the hell out of us. Rules, it would seem, are meant to be broken.

It makes me shake my head when I see pages of reviews devoted to supposedly “proper” literature, when crime is reduced to just a sidebar. To me, crime is the most multi-faceted genre of all, and it’s definitely the hardest to write. Not only do crime authors need to give you plenty of clues – often more than the real police get – but like the anti-Christmas present, the clues should only be recognisable once they’re all wrapped up. Many’s the time, while pondering how much to reveal at any given moment, that I wished I’d started something easier, like a doctorate.

Now that I’ve had some time to let my own voice develop, the battle’s become easier. I’ve got to understand my characters better, and who I am as a writer. If the flavour of my books matures along the way, that’s fine with me. The wonderful thing about subtly changing your formula is that there are always plenty of readers with tastes to match. (Although the one sub-genre that stubbornly fails to excite me is the psychological thriller – I’ve never been super-keen on unpleasant protagonists! Unless they’re funny…)

 

About my books

Senseless and The Darkness Looking Back both feature barman and reluctant psychic James Paxton, an Englishman who tries to escape his reputation back home, but ends up hunting murderers in his adopted city of Auckland, New Zealand. The twists and turns are spiced with dark humour and the beautiful Auckland setting (if I do say so myself). They are now available for the first time in the UK, and are intended to be read, first and foremost, as crime novels, with a tinge of the supernatural.

 

Here’s the blurb to Senseless:

A small park in a nice Auckland suburb is the least likely spot to stumble across a body. The discovery of a man recently bludgeoned to death shatters the illusion of midwinter calm. But unfortunately for James Paxton, death is nothing out of the ordinary. Suspicion falls all too easily on the Englishman who’s hiding a secret. Not only did Paxton find the dead man – he spoke to him, too. Gifts he wished he never had are called into play when Mark Bradley begs him to track down his killer, for the sake of his daughter. Paxton’s carefully constructed new world threatens to crumble as he is sucked into the hunt for a predator, while the police snap close at his heels. And the corpses keep on mounting, one by one …

A darkly gripping mystery with an other-worldly twist.

 

Paxton’s story continues in The Darkness Looking Back. No matter which flavour of crime novel you prefer, I hope you’ll enjoy them!

~~~~~

‘Senseless’ is available to purchase from Amazon UK:-

Paperback – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Senseless-1-James-Paxton-Mysteries/dp/1911266829/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1518460367&sr=1-2&keywords=andrea+jutson

eBook – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Senseless-James-Paxton-Mysteries-Book-ebook/dp/B078S6YT1F/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1518460367&sr=1-1&keywords=andrea+jutson

 

About Andrea Jutson

Andrea Jutson is a writer from Auckland, New Zealand. She has written two crime novels featuring reticent medium James Paxton, the first of which is Senseless, and is at work on a third. In her career, Andrea has been a bookseller, journalist, collections librarian, book buyer and journalist again, and once spent almost a year selling tickets at a heritage site in London. She now works at a public relations agency, and lives in South Auckland.

To find out more about Andrea Jutson’s books visit – http://williamsandwhiting.com/

 

‘Forget Her Name’ by Jane Holland

Last month I took part in the blog tour for ‘Forget Her Name’, which was published on the 25th January 2018 in paperback and as an eBook by Thomas & Mercer. I am now back with my review. I would like to thank the lovely Rachel Gilbey at Rachel’s Random Resources and Jane Holland for my copy of this book.

Rachel’s dead and she’s never coming back. Or is she?

Preparing for her wedding to Dominic, Catherine has never been happier or more excited about her future. That is until she receives an anonymous package, a familiar looking snow globe containing an extremely grisly addition.

Her older sister, Rachel, died on a skiing holiday as a child. Vicious and highly disturbed, Rachel made Catherine’s life an absolute misery. Since then, Catherine has spent her life trying to forget her. Now someone has sent her Rachel’s snow globe, the first in a series of messages.

While Catherine struggles to focus on her new life with Dominic, someone out there seems intent on tormenting her. Who would do this to her and why now? Is Rachel still alive?

This is the first book I have read by Jane Holland and I am so glad that I did. I loved this author’s style of writing and how she keeps you guessing.

The grisly object which Catherine found in the snow globe literally freaked me out. My thoughts kept going back to that one particular scene and I just couldn’t get it out of my head. It was a complete mystery as to who could have been doing all those nasty things to Catherine. I too couldn’t help but wonder if Rachel was still alive.

Things started to become clear later on in the story and at one point I couldn’t help but feel a bit disappointed. Luckily though that feeling didn’t last for long. There was still so much more to things and I was left absolutely shocked. It then became apparent who could be playing the nasty tricks on Catherine.

Out of all of the characters I only really liked Catherine. I ended up suspecting a number of them and wasn’t sure who I could really trust.

This was a fantastic read which had me trying to fit all the pieces of the puzzle together. Jane Holland really knows how to play with your mind. Just when you think nothing else can possibly happen, it does.

‘Forget Her Name’ is a gripping and heart-stopping read. If you’re a fan of psychological thrillers then I really recommend giving this book a go. I will definitely be reading more books by this author.

I give this book 5 out of 5.

~~~~~

‘Forget Her Name’ is available to purchase from:-

Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Forget-Her-Name-Jane-Holland-ebook/dp/B073TTLYQV

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/Forget-Her-Name-Jane-Holland-ebook/dp/B073TTLYQV

 

Blog Tour – ‘Romancing Robin Hood’ by Jenny Kane

When Jenny Kane was looking to put a blog tour together for ‘Romancing Robin Hood’, which was re-released in paperback and as an eBook by Littzwitz Press on 1st February 2018, I was only too happy to help.  The title had me intrigued and I wanted to know more about this book.

Jenny Kane has written a guest post for my blog all about her love for Robin Hood.

 

For the love of Robin Hood
Jenny Kane

Many thanks for inviting me to visit today, so I can share a little of my part modern/part medieval novel, Romancing Robin Hood.

Ever since I was a teenager I’ve had a serious outlaw obsession- all thanks to Richard Carpenter’s wonderful 1980’s television series, Robin of Sherwood. The moment I saw the first episode (which for me, happened to be the 9th episode of series three), I was hooked- not just on the show, but on anything and everything to do with the legend. I watched every film and read every book on the subject of Robin Hood I could find. This interest lasted through my GCSE years, took me through an A’ level history project, a degree, and a PhD in Medieval ballad literature and crime.

Ever since I took up a career in writing, thirteen years ago, I’ve been looking for an excuse to go back through my old history books so I can use them as research for novels. With the writing of Romancing Robin Hood I found that excuse.

Although this novel (first released in 2015 and now re-edited, re-covered and re-released), is 60% modern contemporary romance, the remaining 40% is a fourteenth century adventure. It was a real joy to read through all my old Robin Hood notes and relive the obsessions of my formative years.

 

Book Blurb

When you’re in love with a man of legend, how can anyone else match up?

Dr Grace Harper has loved the stories of Robin Hood ever since she first saw them on TV as a teenager. Now, with her fortieth birthday just around the corner, she’s a successful academic in Medieval History—but Grace is stuck in a rut.

Grace is supposed to be writing a textbook on a real-life medieval criminal gang—the Folvilles—but instead she is captivated by a novel she’s secretly writing. A medieval mystery which entwines the story of Folvilles with her long-time love of Robin Hood—and a feisty young woman named Mathilda of Twyford.

Just as she is trying to work out how Mathilda can survive being kidnapped by the Folvilles, Grace’s best friend Daisy announces she is getting married. After a whirlwind romance with a man she loves as much as the creatures in her animal shelter, Daisy has press-ganged Grace into being her bridesmaid.

Witnessing Daisy’s new-found happiness, Grace starts to re-evaluate her own life. Is her devotion to a man who may or may not have lived hundreds of years ago really a substitute for a real-life hero of her own? Grace’s life doesn’t get any easier when she meets Dr Robert Franks—a rival academic who she is determined to dislike but finds herself being increasingly drawn to… If only he didn’t know quite so much about Robin Hood.

Suddenly, spending more time living in the past than the present doesn’t seem such a good idea…

***

So, what is it about the Robin Hood story that appeals to me – and to Grace- so much?

At its base, the ballads of Robin Hood are about hope, about right triumphing over wrong – no matter who you are- and about doing the right thing. Of course, that is a very simplistic overview. Anyone who has studied the outlaw legends will quickly tell you that Robin Hood didn’t steal from the rich to give to the poor- he stole from the corrupt and cruel- if they were poor that did not matter. Nor did he give his money away- he had his own company of men to feed after all.

The notion of the Robin Hood ballads is a romantic one- despite the lack of a love story in the original tales (Maid Marion didn’t join the story until much later on). I think it’s the idea of justice prevailing no matter what the odds- no matter who is in charge. There is something so appealing about that.

The Robin Hood stories are more popular than ever. With another new Hollywood film about the outlaw due out any minute, and the original Robin of Sherwood cast from the 1980’s back in the studio recording audio dramas for a whole new generation to enjoy, that popularity is not so surprising if you think of the world we currently live in. If ever there was a time for a hero to come and right the corruptions of the country then it’s now!

Here’s an extract to whet the appetite…

It was all Jason Connery’s fault, or maybe it was Michael Praed’s? As she crashed onto her worn leather desk chair Grace, after two decades of indecision, still couldn’t decide which of the two actors she preferred in the title role of Robin of Sherwood.

That was how it had all started, ‘The Robin Hood Thing’ as Daisy referred to it, with an instant and unremitting love for a television show. Yet, for Grace, it hadn’t been a crush in the usual way. She had only watched one episode of the hit eighties series and, with the haunting theme tune from Clannad echoing in her ears, had run upstairs to her piggy bank to see how much money she’d saved, and how much more cash she’d need, before she could spend all her pocket money on the complete video collection. After that, the young Grace had done every odd job her parents would pay her for so she could purchase a myriad of Connery and Praed posters with which to bedeck her room. But that was just the beginning. Within weeks Grace had become pathologically and forensically interested in anything and everything to do with the outlaw legend as a whole.

She’d watched all the Robin Hood films, vintage scenes of Douglas Fairbanks Jr and Errol Flynn, Richard Greene, Sean Connery, and Barry Ingram. As time passed, she winced and cringed her way through Kevin Costner’s comical but endearing attempt, and privately applauded Patrick Bergin’s darker and infinitely more realistic approach to the tale. Daisy had quickly learnt to never ever mention Russell Crowe’s adaption of the story – it was the only time she’d ever heard Grace swear using words that could have been as labelled as Technicolor as the movie had been.

The teenage Grace had read every story, every ballad, and every academic book, paper, and report on the subject. She’d hoarded pictures, paintings, badges, and stickers, along with anything and everything else she could find connected with Robin Hood, his band of outlaws, his enemies, Nottingham, Sherwood, Barnsdale, Yorkshire – and so it went on and on. The collection, now over twenty years in the making, had reached ridiculous proportions and had long since overflowed from her small terraced home to her university office, where posters lined the walls, and books about the legend, both serious and comical, crammed the overstuffed shelves.

Her undergraduates who’d chosen to study medieval economy and crime as a history degree option, and her postgraduates whose interest in the intricate weavings of English medieval society was almost as insane as her own, often commented on how much they liked Dr Harper’s office. Apparently it was akin to sitting in a mad museum of medievalism. Sometimes Grace was pleased with this reaction. Other times it filled her with depression, for that office, its contents, and the daily, non-stop flow of work was her life – her whole life – and sometimes she felt that it was sucking her dry. Leaving literally no time for anything else – nor anyone else. Boyfriends had come and gone, but few had any hope of matching up to the figure she’d fallen in love with as a teenager. A man who is quite literally a legend is a hard act to follow…

***

I hope you enjoyed that. If you would like to read more about Grace, then you can buy Romancing Robin Hood from all good retailers, including…

Amazon – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Romancing-Robin-Hood-Jenny-Kane/dp/1999855248/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1517319761&sr=1-2&keywords=romancing+robin+hood+Jenny+Kane

Also- should you wish to revisit the heady days of 1980’s Robin of Sherwood- I (as Jennifer Ash) was lucky enough to be asked to write 2 episodes of the new audio series. You can find the buy links here- https://spitefulpuppet.com/product-category/robin-of-sherwood/

***

Many thanks again, Sonya.

Happy reading everyone,

Jenny xx

 

About Jenny Kane

With a background in history and archaeology, Jenny Kane should really be sat in a dusty university library translating Medieval Latin criminal records, before writing research documents that hardly anyone would want to read. Instead, tucked away in the South West of England, Jenny Kane writes stories with one hand, while designing creative writing workshops for ‘Imagine’ with the other.

Jenny spends a large part of her time in her local Costa, where she creates her stories, including the novels Romancing Robin Hood (Littwitz Press, 2018), Abi’s Neighbour (Accent Press, 2017), Another Glass of Champagne (Accent, 2016), Abi’s House (Accent Press, June 2015), the best selling contemporary romance Another Cup of Coffee (Accent Press, 2013), and the novella length sequels Another Cup of Christmas (Accent Press, 2013), Christmas in the Cotswolds, (Accent Press, 2014), and Christmas at the Castle, (Accent Press, 2015).

Jenny also writes medieval crime fiction as Jennifer Ash.

The Outlaw’s Ransom and The Winter Outlaw will both be published by Littwitz Press in early 2018

Jenny Kane is also the author of quirky children’s picture books There’s a Cow in the Flat (Hushpuppy, 2014) and Ben’s Biscuit Tin (Hushpuppy, 2015)

Keep your eye on Jenny’s blog at www.jennykane.co.uk for more details.

Twitter – @JennyKaneAuthor   @JenAshHistory    @Imagine_Writing

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/JennyKaneRomance?ref=hl

Facebook for Jennifer Ash – https://www.facebook.com/jenniferashhistorical/?ref=bookmarks

Facebook for Imagine – https://www.facebook.com/ImagineCreativeWriting/?ref=settings

Jenny Kane also writes erotica as Kay Jaybee. (www.kayjaybee.me.uk)

 

Cover Reveal – ‘Call to Arms’ by Rachel Amphlett

I can’t tell you how excited I am to be revealing this cover.  Rachel Amphlett’s new book, ‘Call to Arms’, the fifth in the Detective Kay Hunter series, is being published in paperback and as an eBook on the 11th March 2018 by Saxon Publishing.  I have loved this series from the very start and was a bit worried that there were no more books to come.  I so can’t wait to read it.

It’s time to reveal the cover now.  I hope you love it as much as I do.

Book Blurb

Loyalty has a price.

Kay Hunter has survived a vicious attack at the hands of one of the country’s most evil serial killers.

Returning to work after an enforced absence to recover, she discovers she wasn’t the only victim of that investigation.

DI Devon Sharp remains suspended from duties, and the team is in turmoil.

Determined to prove herself once more and clear his name, Kay undertakes to solve a cold case that links Sharp to his accuser.

But, as she gets closer to the truth, she realises her enquiries could do more harm than good.

Torn between protecting her mentor and finding out the truth, the consequences of Kay’s enquiries will reach far beyond her new role…

Call to Arms is a gripping murder mystery, and the fifth in the Detective Kay Hunter series:

1. SCARED TO DEATH
2. WILL TO LIVE
3. ONE TO WATCH
4. HELL TO PAY
5. CALL TO ARMS

A page-turning whodunit for fans of Peter Robinson, David Baldacci and Harlen Coben.

 

Praise for the Kay Hunter series:

“Thrilling start to a new series. Scared to Death is a stylish, smart and gripping crime thriller”

Robert Bryndza, USA Today bestselling author of The Girl in the Ice

~~~~~

‘Call to Arms’ is available from pre-order from:-

Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Call-Arms-Detective-Hunter-thriller/dp/0648235521/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1517685448&sr=1-1&keywords=call+to+arms+by+rachel+amphlett

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/Call-Arms-Detective-Hunter-thriller/dp/0648235521/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1517687234&sr=1-1&keywords=call+to+arms+by+rachel+amphlett

 

About Rachel Amphlett

Before turning to writing, Rachel Amphlett played guitar in bands, worked as a TV and film extra, dabbled in radio as a presenter and freelance producer for the BBC, and worked in publishing as a sub-editor and editorial assistant.

She now wields a pen instead of a plectrum and writes crime fiction and spy novels, including the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the Detective Kay Hunter series.

Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel cites her writing influences as Michael Connelly, Lee Child, and Robert Ludlum. She’s also a huge fan of Peter James, Val McDermid, Robert Crais, Stuart MacBride, and many more.

She’s a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers Association, with the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint, and the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag.

 

Links

Rachel Amphlett can be contacted via:-

Email – info@rachelamphlett.com

Website – http://www.rachelamphlett.com

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/rachelamphlett.author/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/RachelAmphlett

Instagram – @RachelAmphlett

 

Cover and First Chapter Reveal – ‘The Things We Need to Say’ by Rachel Burton

I am thrilled to be taking part in the cover reveal for Rachel Burton’s new book.  ‘The Things We Need to Say’ is being published as an eBook on the 11th May 2018 by HQ Digital.

I hope you are ready to feast your eyes on the cover.  I really like it and think it’s beautiful.  It reminds me of long summer days.

Here goes……..

Book Blurb

Sometimes the things we never say are the most important.

Fran loves Will with all her heart. They had a whirlwind romance, a perfect marriage and a wonderful life. Until everything changed. Now Fran needs to find her way again and teaching a yoga retreat in Spain offers her just that. Leaving behind a broken marriage she has some very important decisions to make.

Will needs his wife, he needs her to open up to him if they’re to ever return to the ways things once were. But he may have damaged any possibility he had of mending their relationship and now Fran is in Spain and Will is alone.

As both Fran and Will begin to let go of a life that could have been, fate may just find a way of bringing them back together.

Perfect for fans of Katie Marsh, Amanda Prowse and Sheila O’Flanagan

~~~~~

And now to give you a taste of this book here’s the first chapter.

Book Extract

 

DECEMBER 2004

It started at the party. His hands on my hips, my forehead against his shoulder. He asked me to dance but he didn’t know how. We stood together at the edge of the dance floor shaking with laughter at his two left feet. I don’t know how long we stood there. I don’t know if anybody noticed.

He’d waited for me, sitting with my friends, not sure if I’d turn up or not. I wasn’t in the habit of going to work Christmas parties; I only went in the end because he said he would be there, because he said he would wait for me. I arrived just as the main course was being served. I slipped into the seat next to him. His hand brushed against my thigh as I sat down. He held my gaze for longer than he should have done.

I fell in love with him that night as we stood on the dance floor laughing, my hands on his waist, feeling the muscles of his back, the warmth of his body, through his dress shirt, the press of him against my hip.

That was where it began. I sometimes wonder if that should have been where it ended.

But later that evening, as I got out of his car, and I said those words I should have kept to myself, we both knew there was no going back.

 

JULY 2016

Fran

She wakes up in the same position in which she fell asleep, her husband’s arms around her, their hands entwined on her stomach. Neither of them have slept that deeply for months. Fran remembers something: a hotel room on a Greek island, a feeling of hope, of new beginnings. She doesn’t allow the memory to linger. This is what they have now. They can be happy again if they allow themselves to be.

The hot, humid weather has broken in the night and she listens to the sound of summer rain on the roof. Will moves gently against her, pulling her closer. She feels his breath against her neck and the sensation of hot liquid in her stomach, a combination of desire and need. This is their second chance – she can’t let it pass her by.

‘I love you,’ Will says sleepily.

‘I love you too,’ she replies. It feels good to be saying it to each other again. She’s never stopped loving him; she just forgot how to tell him for a while.

‘Do you want me to go and make coffee?’ Will asks, nuzzling her neck.

‘Not just yet,’ she replies, turning around to look at him. His brown eyes are dark, impenetrable pools. His hair is pushed back off his face. Sometimes she forgets how much all of this has affected him too. Sometimes she forgets everything except her own pain. She feels his warmth against her, his strength. She feels as though the gulf that had been threatening to open up between them for the last year is slowly closing. She realises they have so much life ahead of them. So much time to learn to be happy again.

‘I thought I’d lost you,’ Will says quietly, reaching up to stroke her face. ‘I thought you’d gone, but recently I feel as though you’ve come back to me.’

She smiles softly. ‘I thought I’d lost you too,’ she says. ‘This last year has been …’ She doesn’t finish. She can’t finish.

She watches as a shadow of anguish crosses his face, as his brow furrows, as his jaw tightens. She recognises that look, recognises the pain he is trying to hide. She hears the shudder of his breath. His eyes flick away for a moment; he pauses for a fraction too long.

‘No,’ he says. ‘You never lost me. I’ll always be here.’

She kisses him gently then, and feels his hand drift down the bones of her spine.

Later, showered and dressed, they finally appear in the kitchen; Will’s younger brother, Jamie, is already sitting at the table drinking coffee. Will and Fran are hardly able to stop touching each other.

Jamie smiles at them, raising an eyebrow. ‘You’re up late,’ he says. Fran feels herself blushing, her stomach flipping over, and turns away towards the toaster.

‘Thanks for last night,’ Jamie goes on. ‘I needed that.’ Recently separated from his wife, living apart from his children, Jamie is lonely. Last night wasn’t the first Saturday night he’d spent with them. Fran knows Will has been throwing himself into cheering his brother up. She doesn’t mind. Jamie makes Will smile and it’s good to see him smile again.

As Will and Jamie start talking about the cricket, she feels her husband’s hand on her thigh, the warm, solid sensation of him right there next to her. They have been given a second chance, and they have grabbed it with both hands. She isn’t naive enough to think everything is going to go back to the way it used to be, but she knows that they can move on; they can talk and heal together. They can take another chance on living, find a new kind of normal.

Will stretches, draining his coffee cup. ‘This weather isn’t going to let up is it?’ he says looking out of the window where the rain is rattling against the frames like beads in a jar. ‘I’m going to have to cancel the cricket.’ As captain of the village team it is up to him to reschedule this afternoon’s match. Fran is quietly delighted that the weather means she doesn’t have to spend her last afternoon with her husband before she goes away watching him play cricket. Will gets up and walks into his study, shutting the door behind him.

‘How are you feeling about tomorrow?’ Jamie asks.

‘Nervous,’ Fran replies. ‘It’s the first time I’ve been on a plane on my own, which is pathetic at my age, I know.’

‘It’s OK to be nervous.’

‘It’s the first time Will and I have been apart since …’ She trails off. Jamie knows what she’s talking about. ‘I’m worried about him too.’

Jamie smiles. ‘I’ll look after him,’ he says.

After a moment Jamie gets up and follows Will into his study. He doesn’t knock; he just opens the door and walks in. As Fran starts to clear the breakfast dishes she hears raised voices but can’t quite make out what they are saying. She rolls her eyes to herself. As an only child she has long since given up on understanding Will and Jamie’s relationship: best friends one minute, bickering the next. She just hopes Jamie doesn’t stay too long – she wants her husband to herself for the day.

 

Will

It rains all day, the sky grey and waterlogged and heavy with cloud. After Jamie leaves, Will pulls Fran towards him, his hands at the back of her head where her skull meets her neck, where her hair is cut so short.

‘No cricket,’ he says. ‘I’m all yours.’

She smiles, standing on tiptoe to kiss him.

‘Can we just watch a film or something?’ she says. ‘I’m tired and I have to pack for Spain later.’ His stomach drops at the thought of her going away. He wishes he’d never encouraged her to do it.

‘I’d forgotten about Spain,’ he says.

‘No you hadn’t. It’s the only thing we’ve talked about for ages.’

Will had watched Fran spend the last few weeks flipping back and forth between excitement and terror at the thought of going to Spain on her own. He knew she was strong enough to do it; he knew she was stronger than anyone realised. But he also knew that she wondered if she was ready. When she first mentioned Spain to him he had seen it as a perfect opportunity to help her begin to put herself back together again after what had been the worst year of both their lives. He tried to believe that everything life threw at him was an opportunity.

Fran had been teaching at a studio in central Cambridge for six years and had been asked to teach for a week on a retreat in Spain. Will had always supported her teaching, always tried to put her career on a level par with his own and had done everything he could to help her find the strength to go back to work in January. None of it had felt as though it was enough. None of it would make up for the last year, the things he had said, the things he had done. Suddenly he is terrified about being on his own. Neither of them have been alone for months.

‘What do you want to watch?’ he asks, squatting down in front of the TV.

‘Can we watch Some Like it Hot?’ Fran replies.

Will rolls his eyes. He must have seen it a hundred times, but puts it in the DVD player anyway and goes to settle himself on the sofa. ‘Come here,’ he says, and she sits with him, leaning back against his chest.

‘Are you OK about Spain?’ he asks quietly.

‘I think so,’ she says. ‘I’m nervous, but I’m excited as well.’

‘Elizabeth will be there with you, won’t she?’

‘Yes, and Constance. In fact, I already know most of the other people who are going. I’ll be fine.’ She pauses. ‘Are you going to be OK?’ she asks quietly.

‘I’m going to miss you,’ he says, lying back on the sofa, wrapping his arms around her. He doesn’t know how to answer the question. He wants to tell her everything but knows that now is not the right time.

‘I’m going to miss you too,’ she replies.

He kisses the top of her head as she presses ‘play’ on the remote control. He watches her as she watches her favourite film, her lips moving along with the characters – she still knows every word by heart. They used to spend rainy Sundays like this when they were younger, when life seemed easier.

Halfway through the film he realises that Fran is crying – fat, salty tears running down her cheeks.

‘Fran?’ he asks quietly, pressing pause on the remote.

Fran doesn’t reply, she just turns around and he takes her in his arms. He feels her body against his. She clings to him as though her life depends on it and he holds her close as she cries and cries. He can’t remember the last time he saw her cry like this. They had both done their grieving in private over the last year but to Will it feels as though Fran has been holding all this in for months, shutting herself down. He’s relieved that she finally seems ready to let go.

‘I want my old life back,’ she sobs. ‘I want to be happy again.’

‘So do I,’ Will whispers. ‘And we will, in time. I promise.’

‘I wish we’d never bought this house – we had so much hope.’

‘Shhh …’ Will says softly, stroking her hair as she weeps against him.

 

~~~~~

Hopefully your appetite for this book has been well and truly whet.  The good news is that it can be pre-ordered from Amazon UK – http://amzn.to/2kLqSYL

 

About Rachel Burton

Rachel Burton has been making up stories since she first learned to talk. After many false starts she finally made one up that was worth writing down.

After graduating with a degree in Classics and another in English, she didn’t really know what to do when she grew up. She has worked as a waitress, a paralegal and a yoga teacher.

She has spent most of her life between Cambridge and London but now lives in Leeds with her boyfriend and three cats. The main loves of her life are The Beatles and very tall romantic heroes.

Her debut, The Many Colours of Us, was an Amazon Kindle bestseller. Her second novel, The Things We Need to to Say, is released on 11 May 2018. She is currently working on her third novel in which the heroine follows the love of her life to live in a city in northern England. It has no autobiographical elements at all…..maybe.

Find her on Twitter & Instagram as @bookish_yogi or search Facebook for Rachel Burton Author. She is always happy to talk books, writing, music, cats and how the weather in Yorkshire is rubbish. She is mostly dreaming of her next holiday….

 

Links

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/rachelburtonauthor/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/bookish_yogi

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/bookish_yogi/

 

Blog Tour – ‘The Intruder’ by P. S. Hogan

It’s eBook publication day for ‘The Intruder’ by P. S. Hogan, published by Transworld Digital. I am thrilled to be taking part in this blog tour today and would like to say thank you to Rosie Margesson for sending me a proof copy of this book. Read on to find out what I thought of it.

William Heming is an estate agent who has been in the business for seventeen years. He learnt the ropes fast and is very good at what he does. In fact you could say selling properties is his passion. He also has a thing for keys and has a huge collection of them, hundreds in fact. But where does he get them from? He’s sold another property and therefore must reward himself. He has a spare copy of each set of keys cut and keeps them. They are his trophies. He keeps track of what the owners of the property are doing and when they’re out he lets himself in and has a good look around. He’s a people person. He likes to get a feel for them and in a way share their lives. But one day he’ll get caught. Then what will he do?

This book sounded really good so I was delighted to be sent a copy to read for the blog tour. The cover alone is enough to freak you out. I liked the author’s style of writing. Some of the chapters left me needing to know more, especially the ones where you got to learn about William Heming’s past.

The story is narrated by William Heming. I can tell you now that he was one creepy character. I really wouldn’t want to meet him for real. He pulled the wool over so many eyes. How he got away with what he did I really don’t know. If Heming felt someone had done an injustice he would teach them a lesson. But he went way too far which resulted in terrible consequences.

‘The Intruder’ is addictive. It will leave you feeling creeped out, but you’ll find that you have to keep reading on. Whatever you do, remember to change the locks if you have just bought a property. You never know who could be letting themselves in when you’re not at home and when weird things start happening you’ll start think you’re going mad.

Somehow I don’t think I’ll forget this story in a hurry.

I give this book 5 out of 5.

~~~~~

The eBook of ‘The Intruder’ can be purchased from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Intruder-creepiest-sinister-thriller-youll-ebook/dp/B0761XM95Y/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1517425860&sr=1-1&keywords=the+intruder

The paperback (out on the 31st May 2018, published by Black Swan) can be pre-ordered from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Intruder-P-S-Hogan/dp/1784163872/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1517425860&sr=1-1

 

About P. S. Hogan

P. S. Hogan was born in Yorkshire. He is married with four children and has been a journalist and columnist on the Observer for over 20 years.

 

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