A Lover of Books

Archive for the category “New Authors”

Guest Post by Nick Peterson

Pearl's Hereafter

Nick Peterson has just published his debut novel, ‘Pearl’s Hereafter’.  Here is Nick talking about his book.

 

First of all, I’d like to thank Sonya for hosting me on this wonderful blog. What I’d like to do while I’m here is introduce my new book and share a little bit about myself too. Hopefully, you will like what you read!

 

About Pearl’s Hereafter

What would you do if you could turn back the clock?

Crippled with regret and misery, Pearl Greenwood thinks that it is far too late for second chances. Sixty long years have passed since she married the wrong man and let her hobbies fall by the wayside. But on her deathbed, however, she is given the opportunity to re-live her life and remedy her old mistakes.

Transported back to her twenty-first birthday party in 1953, Pearl embarks on a trip down memory lane that is fraught with confusion and difficult choices. Despite the gift of hindsight, Pearl still struggles in her pursuit of happiness and freedom, realising that every choice has its repercussions.

 

About me

Hi there! My name is Nick and I’ve enjoyed writing ever since I was a child. However, I only began producing full-length novels after I graduated from university. Since then, I have written three books in total, with Pearl’s Hereafter being the first! I have been trying to publish my work in the traditional manner, but it seems that the literary agents aren’t interested, so I’m finally taking matters into my own hands! After all, books are meant to be read, aren’t they?

If you wish to accompany Pearl on her crazy journey, then you can do so right here:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TKBNO6W

And I also do some blogging, so you’re very welcome to drop by and say hello:

http://www.nickpetersonbooks.com

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Interview with Bekki Pate

The Willow Tree

Bekki Pate has just had her debut novel, ‘The Willow Tree’ published by Britain’s Next Bestseller.  She kindly took the time to answer some questions for me.

 

Congratulations on having your debut novel published.  Can you tell me a bit about it please?

The novel is a dark, gory horror story that centres around several protagonists including a man on the hunt for his missing girlfriend, a young girl who loses her memory, and the demon that follows her. It is also about friendship and love, involving the young girl and the people she meets on her journey to finding out who she is. It is full of twists, and ends on a cliffhanger that I have already been told is really frustrating for the readers as now they have to wait for the next book!

 

What made you want to pen your first novel?

I have always loved writing, and as a child I loved scary stories such as the Goosebumps and Shivers series, which heavily influenced my earlier work when I was around eight! As a lover of books, I just wanted to write something that I would love to read, and I think I have accomplished that.

 

How long did it take you to write?

The whole trilogy took me around seven years, but this one has taken the longest as I have changed it so many times!

 

Where did you get your ideas from?

I love Stephen King and Richard Laymon, so I think I have been influenced by their way of storytelling, but I usually just ask myself “what scares me?” and I go with that.

 

What exactly does Britain’s Next Bestseller do to help those wanting to publish a book?

Once they accept your manuscript onto their database (you first have to submit a few chapters and synopsis, and then the whole book, and if they like that then you get onto their website) you have a few months to try and obtain 250 pre-orders so it became a campaign of pestering my friends and family, co-workers etc, to pre-order the book. This is harder to do than it sounds – not all authors hit their target.

 

Are you planning to write more novels?

I have written another two novels that follow directly on from this one, and after this I will probably be taking a break for a bit as I am expecting my first child which is really exciting 🙂 But it has made me a bit exhausted and less motivated to write recently.

 

Who are your favourite authors and did any of them inspire you?  

I love Stephen King, Sarah Waters, Richard Laymon, Elizabeth Kostova – I think all books I read inspire me in some way (unless they were really bad!) so I think I take something from each of them and carry that on to shape my own work. Every writer has their own voice, but they also have the voices of all the other writers whose work they admire.

 

Where do you do most of your writing?

Usually anywhere I can – at my desk in the spare room, on the sofa, in a cafe etc. – I don’t mind where I am too much as long as it is relatively quiet and I can sit comfortably.

 

‘The Willow Tree’ is available to buy on Amazon:-

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Fragment-Trilogy-Willow-Tree/dp/1906954372

‘The Single Feather’ by Ruth F. Hunt

The Single Feather

Ruth Hunt has just published her first book, ‘The Single Feather’.  When Ruth contacted me regarding doing something on my blog I was really interested.  I love the cover of her book and the way the white feather stands out.

Below are some questions and answers which Ruth sent over to me.

 

Can you tell me about yourself, your background and how you got into writing?

My name is Ruth F. Hunt and I live in Lancashire.  I was very keen on writing as a child and teenager, and wanted to study Journalism, but at the age of 18 I had an accident and was left with life-changing injuries.

For years after that I didn’t write as time was taken up with work. My disabilities were also getting increasingly difficult to cope with, and I spent a lot of time in and out of hospital.  However, a change in circumstances when I was 30 meant I had long periods at home on my own, and that was when I started to write again.

I launched into writing a book, but halfway through I realised it wasn’t working.  So I took two novel writing courses with http://www.writingclasses.co.uk  and on the first course, the character of Rachel came to me. It was like a complicated jigsaw at first, trying to find pieces that would fit, and taking out those that were not quite the right shape. After many, many drafts I was ready to submit and eventually The Single Feather was ready for publication.

I’m now working on a second novel as well as a collection of linked short stories.

 

Was it because of your own experiences of disability that you decided to have a disabled protagonist?

I have had the benefit of being both able bodied and disabled, and one of the first things I noticed after the accident,  was just how few disabled people I saw in public life, in  films and on the television.  It’s the same for novels.   Bar books for children, there are very few novels with disabled characters let alone a disabled protagonist.

So, it felt right to have a disabled protagonist, especially now as views among the general public have changed. Where once a disabled person may provoke pity, the national press, has been accusing many disabled as ‘faking it’, being ‘scroungers’ and receiving a lot of money from the state.  Older people often have the same problems as disabled people but have been treated differently. It’s one source of tension I wanted to explore in the novel.

 

The ‘vehicle’ you use for structuring the novel revolves around an amateur art group.  Why an art group?

Rachel is an outsider, in every sense of the word. At the start of the novel, she escapes from her home, and moves to Carthom, where apart from help from an agency who visit her, she is on her own.  I thought about who else would be around during the day time, which is where the art group come in. They are all misfits, and some lonely and isolated, and some carrying heavy, smothering secrets around, just like Rachel.  In the novel, it’s not just Rachel who is transformed, but individuals within the group, and the group as a whole. Though it must be said that not everyone has a positive transformation!

 

The cover is very dramatic – with the contrast between the white feather and the dark background. What was the thinking behind it?

The cover as you say shows a pristine white feather, with the background a close up of the detail of the individual strands of the feather.

Rachel is presenting herself as the white feather, hiding the complicated detail behind – such as where she lived prior to Carthom and how she got injured. However, it’s not just Rachel who is pretending to be someone else.

How can you go through life hiding who you really are?

 

You mention Carthom, which is a fictional village in the North of England, but you also mention real places such as The Dream sculpture in St Helens?  Why did you do it like this?

I wanted Rachel and the group to live somewhere that could be anywhere.  So a reader could imagine the characters being part of their own community.

As for The Dream, this sculpture has personal significance for me and my family, as my dad died at Sutton Manor Colliery, which used to be located where the sculpture is now.

Also, being called ‘The Dream’ was a free gift fiction-wise.  Rachel starts the book talking about her hopes and dreams, and so at the close of the book, they all help each other to reach The Dream sculpture.  Will they each get what they want? That would be telling!

 

‘The Single Feather is available as an eBook on Amazon – http://goo.gl/plCeyR

‘The Liar’s Chair’ by Rebecca Whitney

The Liar's Chair

‘The Liar’s Chair’ is Rebecca Whitney’s debut novel.  It was published on the 15th January 2015 by Mantle.  I was kindly sent a proof copy to review.

This story is set in and around Brighton.  Rachel and David appear to have a good solid marriage.  They’ve got everything; a successful business, a big house, nice cars.  What more could they possibly want?  However, things are not as they seem.  David likes to be in control of everything including his wife.

Unknown to David, Rachel has been having a fling with someone else and drinking heavily.  One Saturday morning on the way home and still under the influence of alcohol, Rachel hits a man with her car causing instant death.  She doesn’t know what to do and is terrified so she confesses to David about what she has done.  David destroys all evidence of the accident and insists that they carry on as normal.  But Rachel finds it impossible to do that and can’t switch off at all leading to her behaviour becoming increasingly self-destructive, which doesn’t please David at all.  Will Rachel be able to sort herself out?  That’s for you to find out.

I was looking forward to reading ‘The Liar’s Chair’ as I like a good psychological thriller, especially one where the author has really got into her characters minds.  I thought Rebecca Whitney did an excellent job of this with Rachel.

I found that I couldn’t warm to any of the characters.  None of them were particularly likeable.  I did feel a little bit sorry for Rachel even though what she did was wrong.  David was a nasty character and the way he treated Rachel was appalling.

There are three parts to this book.  I like the way the chapters have been set out, giving you a good insight into Rachel’s past which explains a few things.

‘The Liar’s Chair’ is a sombre, shocking and bold story.

I give this book 4 out of 5.

Interview with Ian Jackson

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Ian Jackson has just had his debut novel published by Percy Publishing.  He has kindly taken the time to answer some questions for me.

 

You’ve written your debut novel.  How do you feel?

Ecstatic! I love the process of writing fiction and have always wanted to complete a crime thriller. I’m very pleased with the finished result. Ruth Killeen my agent says that the book will ‘challenge a readers’ emotions and test their morals’ and I think she’s spot on.

 

Can you tell me a little bit about your book please?

Dead_Charming_front_cover

Dead Charming is a psychological crime thriller based in Greater Manchester. The book tells the story of two central characters, Jenny Foster a novice criminal profiler and Joe Reed a serial rapist and later murderer.

Joe Reed is charming and charismatic and the book opens to describe his crimes against the women he has seduced. As the novel continues, all is not what it seems and Reed takes the reader through a series of twists and turns, analysing his psychopathy with terrifying results.

Jenny Foster is married with a daughter and her ambition has driven her on to secure her dream role as a criminal profiler attached to the Manchester Metropolitan Police. She is soon out of her depth as the investigation becomes more complicated and she is faced with real-life situations. At the same time, her personal life spirals out of control with catastrophic results putting her entire team in danger.

 

How long did it take you to write?

I began writing Dead Charming in February 2013 and finished in October 2013, so about nine months. Perhaps that’s why they call a finished novel, the writer’s ‘baby’.

 

Where did you get your ideas from?

I have always been interested in psychology and crime. The characters portrayed do not resemble anyone I know, but each of us has the capacity to be unkind, with that trait developing into evil for some people.

I spent two years as a volunteer at a Wirral hospital in the psychiatric unit and a further five years as a volunteer at a homeless shelter. I encountered many forms of mental illness, some of which could clearly lead to violence if left unchecked.

I became interested in what triggers would be necessary to turn a sufferer of somewhat mild or common psychological imbalances into a person that might commit despicable acts. I asked myself who might be to blame when a person who might be a borderline sociopath escalates their behaviour to act out their psychotic fantasies.

That journey of discovery continues.

 

What are you working on now if anything?

I work full time, running my own business in Chester and write when I find the time.

I am currently writing my second novel, with the working title Dead Precious and have committed to a completion deadline of April 2015.

 

Where is your favourite place to write?

Someone mentioned to me recently that many novelists tend to write sitting up in bed, but I would be asleep with my head lodged into my laptop keyboard after ten minutes.

I enjoy writing in public when there’s a great deal going on. Somehow, it helps my train of thought to look up every now and again and perhaps see a glimpse of one of my characters’ personalities in a passerby.

 

Would you like to see your book made into a film?

Of course, I think every writer dreams of having their characters come to life on film. If casting was up to me, I would choose Sheradin Smith (Cilla, Mrs Biggs) to play the part of Jenny Foster and Richard Armitage (Spooks, The Hobbit) as Joe Reed.

 

Is 2015 going to be a good year for you? 

I sincerely hope so. My daughter, Anna is due back from Australia in May, my son, Tom will hopefully take up his chosen profession as a Speech and Language Therapist at UCL and I get married to my fiancée, Susie in June. This all means that 2015 should be a very special and memorable year.

 

About Ian Jackson

I was born in Liverpool in 1964.

I am a local magazine and sports programme publisher and I run a small advertising business. I have been in advertising and publishing since 1989. I also organise events and awards.

I have written many articles for consumer magazines such as Concept for Living and Style Guide for The Daily Mail and I am an accomplished feature writer.

My debut novel, Dead Charming, stems from a keen interest in psychology and crime, where the experiences of both perpetrator and victim can be analysed through their emotional and psychological turmoil with often terrifying results.

I have two children, Tom, 23 who has gained a Masters Degree in Psycholinguistics and is currently studying to work in the NHS with stroke victims and Anna, 20 who is currently working and travelling in Australia.

 

Links

‘Milked’ by Lisa Doyle – Book Launch

Book Cover - Milked

‘Milked’ is Lisa Doyle’s debut novel.  Published by Simon and Fig, we are today celebrating it’s release.  Read on to learn more about this book.

 

Book Blurb

By and large, Amanda Keane makes pretty good decisions. Okay, she might not have the best taste in men, but she’s got great friends, a good job, and an independent spirit. That is, until her 30th birthday ushers in a whirlwind romance with a sexy Irish musician who leaves her, not at the altar as she imagined, but accidentally pregnant. And when he disappears, she’s downsized out of a job, her apartment is robbed, and lapsed health insurance coverage leaves her with a C-section to pay for, Amanda is launched headfirst into the life of a broke single mom. But her friend and uber successful ob-gyn, Joy, clues her in to an unlikely temp position with one of Chicago’s celebrity elite that just may be the answer to all her woes. Or could it be just the beginning?

It’s with serious trepidation that Amanda embarks on her surprisingly lucrative new career: underground wet nurse to the offspring of Chi-town’s rich and famous. Amanda must quickly understand how to live at the whims and mercy of the one percent as she deals with the irony of nursing – and loving – someone else’s child, while still making ends meet for her own daughter. And then there’s Cute Daycare Dad (aka Dan), who’s obviously interested in her. But can she afford to tell him what she really does for a living? Is her new job (something she thought went out with the 19th century) a shameful thing? Just another way of selling her body? Or does it have something to teach her after all?

A novel of motherhood, its many demands, and all the little triumphs along the way, MILKED is a warm and witty debut about making tough choices and traveling the roundabout road to happiness.

 

About Lisa Doyle

LDoyleheadshot_2014

Lisa Doyle is a communications manager and freelance writer based in the Chicago area. A native of Hinsdale, Illinois and a graduate of Miami University, she spent several years editing business-to-business publications for the personal care industry before moving to the nonprofit sector, and currently works in advocacy for homeless families at Bridge Communities in Glen Ellyn, Illinois. She has written for major beauty trade publications (Global Cosmetic Industry, Skin Inc, Salon Today, Modern Salon, Renew, Suburban Life) and is a contributor to WOMEN REINVENTED: TRUE STORIES OF EMPOWERMENT AND CHANGE (LaChance Publishing, 2010).

Doyle is represented by Claire Anderson-Wheeler of Regal Literary, Inc., a full-service agency based in New York.

 

For more about Lisa, please visit her website.

On twitter she’s @bylisadoyle.

On Facebook she’s at https://www.facebook.com/bylisadoyle.

For buy links, please go to www.simonandfig.com

‘Plague Land’ by S D Sykes + Competition

Plague Land

‘Plague Land’ was published today in both hardback and eBook. I first heard about this book from History Lives, the historical fiction community from Hodder & Stoughton.  It sounded so interesting and I was very kindly sent a proof copy to read and review.  ‘Plague Land’ is S D Sykes debut novel; an exciting new voice in historical crime.

This story is based in medieval Kent and is set in the aftermath of the Black Death.  It is 1350 and Oswald de Lacy has been sent home from the monastery he was packed off to at the young age of seven.  Now eighteen and having recently lost his father and two older brothers to the Black Death, he is faced with a huge amount of responsibility.  It will be his job to run the estate as Lord of Somershill Manor, something he never expected.

Oswald has no idea just how bad things are. The years of pestilence and neglect have affected the estate badly and lots of people have lost their lives.  His mother however still remains the powerful matriarch of the family and his sister Clemence who isn’t very easy to get on with still lives at Somershill Manor.  Just as Oswald is about to tackle things he is notified about a vicious murder of a young woman.  The rather ambitious village priest insists that she was killed by demonic dog-headed men, but Oswald sees his claim as a load of nonsense.  He soon finds himself with the job of trying to solve the crime and find the murderer, but each step he takes seems to lead him into a maze of political intrigue, family secrets and violence.

I knew as soon as I opened this book that I was going to enjoy reading it. The prologue had me totally intrigued.  If I had not known that this was S D Sykes debut novel I would never have guessed, it is that good.  The quality of the writing throughout is amazing and the story doesn’t drag.  S D Sykes paints a very good picture of what life was like in those days.

There is a handy glossary to refer to and at the end a very interesting historical note from the author which is really worth reading.

‘Plague Land’ is a fascinating and intriguing read and a real page-turner.  This is historical crime at its best.  I am already looking forward to S D Sykes next book.

I give this book 5 out of 5.

 

Both S D Sykes and History Lives are on Twitter.  Do follow them.

S D Sykes – @SD_Sykes

History Lives – @HistoryLives_

 

Competition

Three very lucky people have a chance to win a copy of ‘Plague Land’.  To enter leave a comment telling me what your favourite era is.

 

Terms and Conditions

This competition is open to UK residents only.

The closing date is 11:59 p.m. on the 12th October 2014.

Winners will be notified within 7 days and their details will be passed on to Hodder & Stoughton who will send out the prizes.

 

Good luck! 🙂

Adrian Harvey – Guest Blog Post

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Earlier this year Adrian Harvey’s debut novel ‘Being Someone’ was published by Urbane Publications.  Below is a lovely blog post by Adrian in which he explains where he got his inspiration from when writing this book.

I hope you enjoy reading it.

 

Things are seldom as they seem

Inspiration comes from many places and in all shapes and sizes. In my case, it came from India, in the hefty form of an elephant. That elephant was long dead, and I never had the chance to meet him. It also turned out that he wasn’t even real. But his story was the starting point of my novel, Being Someone. Quite literally, in the sense that a version of it became the first chapter, but the elephant was also the inspiration for everything that followed. The elephant, who I called Iravatha, was both the starting point and the frame for the novel, and he keeps poking his very long nose into the story.

In the book, the story of Iravatha is told to the narrator in a little park in the middle of Mysore and, to all intents and purposes, it is the same story that was told to me a little park in the middle of Mysore, some seven years ago. Essentially, it is an Indian version of the story of Greyfriar’s Bobby. If you don’t know the story, it’s the ‘true’ story of a little dog – Bobby no less – who keeps returning to the grave of his dead master in an Edinburgh church yard. There’s a Disney movie, made in the sixties, about the tale. It’s very touching.

When I got back to London I checked and there was no Iravatha. The boy I had met in Mysore had been telling stories, conflating bits and pieces of truth to create an impression, an effect. And it worked; I liked it. But what attracted me most to it was the ambiguity in its apparent simplicity and honesty.

You see, there is an account of Greyfriar’s Bobby that suggests that, rather than a heart warming account of loyalty and enduring love, it was simply a wheeze dreamed up to attract tourists to Edinburgh and in fact – a little like Lassie – a number of different dogs played the role over the years. Other versions suggest that ‘Bobby’ was just one of a number of stray dogs that hung around the cemeteries of the city, waiting for the highly emotional human visitors, who would feed them.

Now, the relationship between a mahout and his elephant is deep, often lifelong. But it is also complex and problematic. Mahouts are seldom entirely kind to the animals they train and tend and, as we know, elephants have very long memories within which to hold their grudges. I started to play with the layers of truth that might be bound up with my elephant story and, for some reason, this ambiguity made me think about a marriage.

So Being Someone became a love story: a man – let’s call him James – and a woman – let’s call her Lainey – fall in love; they get married, and then things happen, as things so often insist on doing.

 

AH_headshot1

Since escaping the East Midlands to find his fortune in the big city, Adrian Harvey has combined a career in and around government with trying to see as much of the world as he can. He lives in North London, which he believes to be the finest corner of the world’s greatest city. Being Someone is his first novel.

 

‘Being Someone’ is available to buy on Amazon – http://georiot.co/3syu

You can also buy it from http://urbanepublications.com

Interview with DJ Priddle

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DJ Priddle’s debut novel ‘The Honey Trap’ is being published by Percy Publishing.  It is out on Kindle from Monday 1st September 2014 with the paperback being released on 19th September 2014.  DJ Priddle kindly took the time to answer some questions for me.

 

Tell me a bit about your book ‘The Honey Trap’.

The Honey Trap is a story about a ‘bad’ cop, Jonas Brock, who used to work in the Metropolitan Police Force. He has made some pretty bad decisions and ended up in prison. The story focuses on his life, and his attempts to rebuild his broken relationships, but unfortunately for him, he is not very good at it. He is selfish and broken by his own past, and continues to hurt all of the people that he cares for the most. Jonas takes on some private investigator work, but is soon out of his depth with an enormous fraud case and unexplained murder.

 

How long did it take you to write it?

I did a lot of reading and learning before I sat down to write the book. I looked at a lot of advice pages and blogs to try to learn the process, and one quote that stuck in my mind throughout, was from Stephen King. He said, “If you haven’t finished it in three months then it’s not worth keeping.” I used this as my own rule and kept to his guidelines. I built the story in my mind for the first month and then got it down on paper in the second month. It is at this point when the real writing starts, because most people will find that the first draft is terrible. Only a small handful of people will have the perfect first draft, but for most of us, it is just a written barrage of nonsensical ideas. I edited for the third month, crossing things out and screwing up whole pages of drivel, before only keeping what works. It is very difficult to know when to stop editing, it is easy to become hyper critical of your own work, so I listened to a quote from Leonardo Da Vinci and it became my mantra, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

 

Did you have to do any research?

Yes. Lots. ‘The Honey Trap’ is about things that I knew nothing about. While the story line (I hope) is about human interaction and relationships, the setting was new to me. I am a huge fan of British TV police dramas and wanted to explore those dark ideas. As I began to build Jonas Brock’s back-story, I decided that to know as much about him as possible, I would write short biographies of each of his close family. In each case, I researched the historical details of their lives, such as his mother’s role as a female in the MET throughout the sixties and seventies, and also the closure of the London cargo docks. Although very little of this research appeared in the book, I found that it gave me a far better insight into the environment that Jonas was part of.

I also enlisted the help of a friend, who works in the police force, to ensure that the procedural information was correct.

 

Did you always want to write?

It was not that always wanted to write, I just did. Since I was young, I’ve always enjoyed creative writing. Throughout school I wrote short stories and enjoyed studying English Literature and the Greek Classics. I had two English teachers at high school who were a huge inspiration to me, and their passion for the classic writings of Sophocles, Homer, Harper Lee and Shakespeare meant that I really engaged with them. I remember closing my eyes as they would read the books aloud to the class, and letting the ideas and images fill my brain. I was inspired by the way that the characters interacted with each other. The main storyline always felt merely like a top layer of a much more complex idea, to me, and that is what I wished to create in my own writing. As I got older, I continued to write, but never completed anything. I realised that I did not know how to write a story, to the end. I did not have the focus or the attention span to see it through. So, I had to retrain my brain and learn the craft of ‘long-distance’ writing.

 

Are you working on any other writing projects?

I am currently working on the follow up second and third book of the series. After finishing ‘The Honey Trap’ I realised that I had only really finished the very beginning of the story. The story is bigger than I had originally planned, and Jonas has a long way to go before his own journey is complete. I began planning the second book, ‘Blood Runs Deep,’ at the end of June this year, but as I was planning, I soon found that book two and three were so closely intertwined, that they would have to be written together. It has become a very complex story, with a great deal more characters to introduce, and I think that the only way to stay true to the original idea is to write them both, and then split them into two books.

 

What advice do you have for anyone wishing to write their first novel?

My advice would probably go on for pages and pages, but I will try to be brief.

  1. Learn how to write. By this I mean, don’t assume that the idea in your head will spill out onto the pages fully formed. This is rarely the case. The mind is a collection of ideas and images, connected by the thinnest and delicate threads. On paper, these ideas are less than appealing to a reader. Take the time to learn the process. There is now so much information out there from authors, teachers and editors. Trawl the Internet and you can find help groups and lessons on how other people have gone about it. I read the ‘Dramatica Theory of Story Structure,’ an idea that the story has its own mind and personality predetermined by the storytelling, and tried to implement some of its ideas into my own writing. Read anything on the Internet called, ‘How to write a novel,’ or similar and learn whatever you can.
  2. Plan! Plan! Plan! The more time that you dedicate to planning your book the better you will understand it. If you don’t know the story, how can you ever expect to narrate it to your reader? Readers are as fickle as you are, and they will quickly see through a writer who is ‘making it up as they go along.’ So, you have to believe what you are writing. Know your backdrop, understand your story and feel your characters. Laugh with them, get angry with them and cry with them. It will make the story more believable for your reader.
  3. Probably the most important advice of all is, Write. Nobody wrote a novel by staring at a computer screen. It is true that everyone has a novel inside them, but what is the main difference between them and an author? The author actually finished it.

So, sit and tap away at the keyboard, and give yourself permission to be exceptionally bad at it. Write rubbish, use terrible grammar, make spelling mistakes and lose your storyline to go on a worthless tangent, but do not stop, until its finished. Then, and only then, edit. Writing and editing are different processes; do not confuse them as one. When you write, you do just that. No sooner than the idea is formed in your mind, it is shot out of your fingertips and onto the page. Editing is a slow and analytical process, and in my opinion, where the real storytelling happens. Each sentence is taken apart, one word at a time, and reconstructed to flow and to entice the reader to read on. Write hot, edit cold. Write freely without censoring yourself in any way. Allow those creative ideas to rush out of your psyche, and hopefully you will create something wonderful. Edit as if it is the worst story that you have ever read. Be harsh, show no mercy and do not spare your feelings. Sometimes in an edit, you will have to get rid of ideas that you have come to care about. You will kill off characters, lose whole scenes of amazing creativity, and sometimes you will be sad to see them go. However, if it does not move the narrative forward, then you need to get rid of it. Be prepared to kill those ideas. Do not get precious about them. What you have at the end could be the greatest work of fiction that the world has ever seen, it probably is not, but that ‘maybe’ is hope enough for any author.

 

What do you like doing in your spare time?

I’m the lead singer of a rock band. No really, I am. My wife and I run a wedding and function band, and I’m the front man. I travel the country in an old transit van and perform on stage. When I am not doing that, I write press releases for an independent PR company and I present a show on local radio. I live with my wife and three daughters, which mean that my spare time is filled very quickly with DIY, day’s out and dad duties. If after all of that, I have any time left, I might watch a film.

 

About DJ Priddle

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DJ Priddle has worked as a professional musician and actor since leaving school and drawing from his experiences from performing.  As well as filming with BBC and ITV, he has always been a keen writer of lyrics, scripts and short stories, and now his love of crime thrillers and dark fantasy novels has helped him to pursue his own professional writing career.

Now he performs weekly in a top UK function band as well as presenting on local radio, while working as a full time writer.

He lives on the Isle of Wight with his wife and three young daughters.

 

‘The Honey Trap’ will be available to buy on Amazon and can currently be pre-ordered:-

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Honey-Trap-DJ-Priddle-ebook/dp/B00MZEMP6Q/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1409381115&sr=8-3&keywords=the+honey+trap

 

 

‘Dance with the Enemy’ by Rob Sinclair + Competition

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Earlier this year Rob Sinclair published his debut novel ‘Dance with the Enemy’.  The first in a trilogy, the second book should be published next year.

 

Book Blurb

Carl Logan was the perfect agent. A loner, with no real friends or family, he was trained to deal with any situation with cold efficiency, devoid of emotion. But Logan isn’t the man he used to be, or the asset he once was. Five months ago his life changed forever when he was captured, tortured and left for dead by Youssef Selim, one of the world’s most violent terrorists. When Selim mysteriously reappears in Paris, linked to the kidnapping of America’s Attorney General, Logan smells his chance for revenge. Pursuing his man relentlessly, oblivious to the growing trail of destruction that he leaves in his wake, Logan delves increasingly deep into the web of lies and deceit surrounding the kidnapping. Finally, he comes to learn just what it means to Dance with the Enemy.

 

Author Bio

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Rob began writing in 2009 following a promise to his wife, an avid reader, that he could pen a ‘can’t put down’ thriller.

Dance with the Enemy, the story of embattled intelligence agent Carl Logan, is Rob’s first published novel and the first in a trilogy of novels following Carl Logan.

The second novel in the series is planned for release in 2015. Rob is a qualified accountant. He has worked for a global accounting firm since graduating from The University of Nottingham in 2002, specialising in forensic fraud investigations at both national and international levels.

Originally from the North East of England, Rob has lived and worked in a number of fast paced cities, including New York, and is now settled in the West Midlands with his wife and young sons.

 

‘Dance with the Enemy is available to buy on Amazon.  Click on the links below:-

UK:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dance-Enemy-Rob-Sinclair-ebook/dp/B00KK6FJSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1407093974&sr=8-1&keywords=dance+with+the+enemy

US:

http://www.amazon.com/Dance-Enemy-Rob-Sinclair-ebook/dp/B00KK6FJSC/ref=sr_1_1_bnp_1_kin?ie=UTF8&qid=1407839570&sr=8-1&keywords=dance+with+the+enemy

 

Competition

Three very lucky people have the chance to win a signed paperback copy of ‘Dance with the Enemy’.  To enter just leave a comment telling me what books you have bought or won recently.

 

Terms and Conditions

This competition is open to UK residents only.

The closing date is 11:59 p.m. on the 7th September 2014.

Winners will be notified within 7 days and their details will be passed on to Rob Sinclair who will send out your prizes.

 

Good luck! 🙂

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