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Archive for the tag “self-published”

Blog Tour – ‘Abel’s Revenge’ by Ross Greenwood

‘Abel’s Revenge’ was published as an eBook on the 25th March 2018 and is also available in paperback. Having read and reviewed Ross Greenwood’s last book I was thrilled to be invited to take part in this blog tour. I would like to thank both Caroline Vincent who organised this tour and Ross Greenwood for my review copy of his book.

This story is set in a city, London to be precise. Like any other place, there’s violence. There are murderers who live amongst us.

This is also a tale about a couple who are sometimes friends, occasionally lovers, but always partners no matter what happens. Dan and Olivia are fighting everyday battles; the ones parents have over a lack of money, time or peace.

Meanwhile an escalating serial killer is terrifying the streets and homes. As the body count rises their relationship crumbles. Society reveals its dark side and it seems no one is safe. Will Abel’s reign of terror ever end or will it get worse?

I loved the sound of ‘Abel’s Revenge’ and was really looking forward to reading it. This is the second of Ross Greenwood’s books that I have read. I really do like his style of writing. The short chapters made the story all the more exciting and left me dying to know what was going to happen next.

The chapters are narrated mainly by the main characters; Abel, Dan and Olivia. There are two different storylines. There’s the serial killer who commits some absolutely horrendous crimes and then there’s Dan and Olivia who are going through a rough time.

I liked the dark humour in this story. There was also quite a bit of toilet humour which might not be to everyone’s taste. Dan and Olivia are an everyday flawed normal couple who are having a few ups and downs. There’s never enough money or time to do everything. Having children also means they don’t get much peace. Dan has a nervous breakdown and is signed off work for months and from then on his relationship with Olivia seems to get worse. In the meantime, Abel is roaming the streets, terrorising and torturing people. He’s out for revenge and he’ll do what he can to rid the city of vermin. Who needs dealers and pimps anyway.

That ending! I never in a million years expected to read what I did. It left me really quite shocked.

‘Abel’s Revenge’ is gripping and exciting and will leave you wanting more.

Thanks for a fabulous read, Ross. You are fast becoming one of my favourite authors and I await your next book eagerly.

I give this book 5 out of 5.

~~~~~

‘Abel’s Revenge’ is available from:-

Amazon UK – http://bit.ly/AbelsRevenge-RossGreenwood-AmazonUK

Amazon US – http://bit.ly/AbelsRevenge-RossGreenwood-AmazonUS

 

Links

Website – www.rossgreenwoodauthor.com

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/RossGreenwoodAuthor/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/greenwoodross

 

Other Books by Ross Greenwood

Lazy Blood (Sept. 2016) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2pqxLfo
The Boy Inside (Febr 2017) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2uuGWRQ
Fifty Years of Fear (Sept.2017) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2DY1TWB

 

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Lynne Milford’s (aka LM Milford’s) Monthly Guest Post – March 2018

It’s time for Lynne Milford’s monthly guest post. I hope you have enjoyed her posts so far. They really are fascinating. For ease of reference I will add the links to them at the bottom. Today Lynne is talking about creating the perfect cast for her book.

 

Creating the perfect cast for A Deadly Rejection

JK Rowling famously said that Harry Potter walked into her head fully formed. Sadly, my main character, journalist Dan Sullivan, certainly did not. Instead he’s been dragged, kicking and screaming into the person he is now.

I started writing A Deadly Rejection a long time ago and, as I was writing what I know, I based Dan very loosely on the male friends I had at the time. Boys in their early 20s are a bit daft and don’t really take things seriously – or at least the guys I knew didn’t – and so that’s what Dan did.

But then I shared the book with my editor and she said ‘he seems a bit childish’. And indeed he was. He was a terrible sulk and didn’t really think things through. This worried me because I needed the reader to take him seriously. So I took a step back and Dan grew up a lot, very quickly.

I’d decided to write a male main character because I always struggled to develop realistic female characters. Instead of coming out as real people, they were always what I wanted to be – tall, slim, gorgeous and brilliant at everything. That doesn’t work for a fictional character because no one is perfect – and frankly they’ll just come across as smug and annoying for the reader. So instead I took a step away by choosing a male lead.

All great characters generally have a fatal flaw, something that will prove to be their downfall. For example, Macbeth’s fatal flaw is ambition. In a journalist, this works particularly well and so Dan developed a serious ambition problem. You can see by the mistakes he makes and the way he acts that he’s getting carried away. He needs someone to bring him in line. That’s where your supporting cast comes in.

Your main character needs friends who bring out the best in them and enemies who bring out the worst. In the first instance, Dan has Emma and Ed, both work colleagues and friends. I often feel deeply sorry for them as they battle to keep Dan from flying off at a tangent. Then there are those who play on his fatal flaw and drag him towards danger knowing that he’ll follow where they lead, desperate for the next step in his career.

But the relationships between Dan and Emma and Dan and Ed are not straightforward. For a start, Emma can’t stand him. His ambition and borderline arrogance get on her nerves. But one of the reasons that happens is because she shares his ambition, up to a point. (There is a reason but that’s for a later book.) However, she has a well developed sense of self preservation. You can’t imagine her behaving the way Dan does. Ed again is different. He’s not ambitious but he does a good job at what he does. At times Dan drives him mad because he doesn’t understand why Dan behaves the way he does. He doesn’t understand the need to prove yourself because he’s secure in himself and what he wants.

It’s equally important to create a good villain. Your bad guy needs to work against your hero and frustrate him at every turn. This means that your bad guy needs to know how to push your hero’s buttons. In A Deadly Rejection, the bad guys know exactly how to reel Dan in until they’ve got him exactly where they want him. But your bad guy needs to be realistic. He (or she) needs to fit into the book, sometimes fit right into the world your characters live in, hiding his evil nature in plain sight. It’s as important for your villain to be right, as for your hero.

I hadn’t initially planned for Dan to be a series character. I’d intended to make the town the centre of the story, with the same police officers, but Dan would only play cameo roles in the later books. But he seems to have been popular with readers so far and so he’s going to be leading the series. Let’s just hope it doesn’t go to his head, eh?

 

 

Book Blurb

How far would you go to get what you want?

Beneath the bustling, respectable exterior of the Kent town of Allensbury lies a world of corruption and greed.

When local news reporter Dan Sullivan scents a story in the local council, he begins to ask questions. But when his source dies in mysterious circumstances, Dan is implicated. He is quickly drawn into a world of lies, ambition and avarice as he fights to clear his name.

The more he digs, the more someone tries to stop the story from ever seeing the light of day.

Dan must decide what’s more important to him…the story, or his life.

 

Links

Book shortlink to Amazon http://ow.ly/57IG30fS5F5

Long link UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deadly-Rejection-would-what-want-ebook/dp/B0768WP1SB/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1507972626&sr=8-1&keywords=a+deadly+rejection

LM Milford’s blog – http://www.lmmilford.wordpress.com/

Twitter – @lmmilford

 

Previous Guest Posts

First guest post (January 2018) – My writing journey

https://aloverofbooks.wordpress.com/2018/01/31/lynne-milfords-monthly-guest-post/

Second guest Post (February 2018) – Where did A Deadly Rejection come from?

https://aloverofbooks.wordpress.com/2018/02/27/lynne-milfords-aka-lm-milfords-monthly-guest-post/

Blog Tour – ‘The Absent Man’ by Robert Enright

‘The Absent Man’, the second book in the Bermuda Jones Case Files series is out tomorrow the 9th March 2018 as an eBook and is already available in paperback.  I can’t tell you how thrilled I am as I absolutely loved ‘Doorways’.  I really can’t wait to read this book.

I would like to thank Robert for inviting me to take part in this blog tour for which he has written a guest post.

 

Writing a sequel

Hello! So as part of my blog tour, Sonya has agreed to let me write a guest post that she will very kindly share with all. I had the pleasure of meeting Sonya at an Urbane night in a room full of authors and she was as lovely in person as she is on social media. She has been one of the most supportive and engaging people I have had the pleasure to meet since trying this writing malarkey, so I thought I’d start this by saying a big thank you to her for her constant support and also badgering me to write this damn sequel!

So that is the topic of this guest post. Writing a sequel.

You know what…it was harder than I thought. I had a good chat with a friend of mine about it and he thought it would be easy, because so much of it is already established. Now if you have read DOORWAYS, then you would have been introduced to my hero, Bermuda Jones and his enigmatic partner, Argyle. Not only that, you would have been introduced to the entire concept of ‘The Otherside’, the BTCO and the backstory involving the truth between our world and the other.

But what happens if you haven’t read Doorways? (By the way, I am not encouraging you to skip Doorways. Please buy my books and make me happy!)

That was the biggest problem to tackle. Because some people will join this series on this book, so I need to re-introduce EVERYTHING that was established in the first book, with enough detail so a new reader gets on board and dives in. However, I can’t repeat myself from Doorways, because those readers who have finished that book will be annoyed by forking out cash for a repeat novel. Establishing that fine line was a lot trickier than I thought it would be and it was a real challenge.

What I will say is that having a book with all of the key details noted down for each character was a real help. I know everything from their facial features to their dates of birth, which allowed for easier introductions. Once the first few chapters were written, I’d say probably when I got to about chapter six, I was able to stop trying to introduce the characters once again and was able to run with the story, which was a lot of fun. By the time I got to the end of the book, it felt nice to see just how fleshed out the characters and story was.

I really hope you pick up the Bermuda Jones series (wow, feels weird to know there is more than one book now!) and I really hope you enjoy it. The Absent Man is very special to me as it marks an exciting new direction not just for Bermuda Jones and Argyle, but also my career as a writer.

Thanks for reading and take care.

Robert Enright

~~~~~

Thank you so much for the lovely introduction, Robert.  I am really quite touched.

 

 

Book Blurb

BERMUDA JONES AND ARGYLE ARE BACK IN THE THRILLING SEQUEL TO DOORWAYS

Something is killing…

A woman is found dead in her flat on a freezing night in Glasgow, her heart ripped from her chest. With no signs of a weapon or forced entry. Hours later, her heart is delivered to the Necropolis on the outskirts of town.

Six months after stopping the terrifying Barnaby atop Big Ben, Bermuda finds himself on the hunt for a killer in a city he doesn’t know with a police force that doesn’t want him. With no links between the victims and the death toll rising, Bermuda has to face a sceptical detective, a seemingly distracted Argyle and an unknown horror that stalks from the shadows.

All in the name of answering one question…

Who is The Absent Man?

The Absent Man is an urban fantasy thriller that revisits The Otherside and will have you on the edge of your seat.

~~~~~

‘The Absent Man’ can be purchased in paperback from Amazon UK – http://amzn.to/2oSVI0E

Pre-order the eBook from Amazon UK – http://amzn.to/2oYaZN6

 

About Robert Enright

Robert Enright was born and raised in North London and resides in Chesham, Buckinghamshire. Working as a HR System Manager by day, he spends his evenings and weekends writing (or binge watching TV with his fiance).

Robert first self published One by One in March 2016 and saw it published by Britain’s Next Best Seller in October 2017.

In early 2018, DOORWAYS will be re-released as an ebook, paperback and audio book under Robert Enright’s management. The sequel, THE ABSENT MAN will also be released in early 2018. The third in the series, WORLDS APART, is set for a late 2018 launch. A prequel, titled BERMUDA, is in the works for a 2018 launch also.

Robert can be contacted via:-

Website – http://www.robertenright.co.uk

Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/robenrightauthor

Twitter – https://twitter.com/REnright_Author

 

Lynne Milford’s (aka LM Milford’s) Monthly Guest Post

I am delighted to welcome the lovely Lynne Milford aka LM Milford back to my blog.  Lynne was the winner of my competition to feature on my blog for a whole year.  Here is her second guest post.

 

Where did A Deadly Rejection come from?

When you’re starting out as a writer, one of the first pieces of advice you’re given is ‘write what you know’. There are several schools of thought on whether this is good advice or not – some say you can write about what you like as long as you’ve done the research. But I think when you’re first starting out, writing about something you know well means you can concentrate on learning how to write, without having to stop and research every step. That can come later, once you have writing experience.

In a former life, I was a local newspaper reporter for about 8 years. In that time I did some great jobs and some awful jobs. One of the not-quite-so-bad jobs was covering council meetings. I’d been to them all – planning, licensing, governance, for example. These meetings could be fascinating and dull in equal measures. Sometimes you had to dig to get a story from them, but there was always something there if you looked hard enough.

It was during a meeting of the ‘Innovation Panel’ that my brain started to stir.

The meeting had run on for two hours, with very little innovation taking place, when the councillors decided they’d better have a comfort break. My heart sank at the idea of yet more time wasted. Bear in mind that it was now after 8pm and I’d been working since 9am. In addition, I have to file what stories I could glean from the meeting before I could go to bed (to fill any spaces left in the next day’s edition). I had pages and pages of shorthand notes and began to review them to make writing up easier. Near me, as I sat at the desk kept for the press, was a small gaggle of councillors and officers deep in whispered conversation. As I picked up my pen to make a note in the margin by a useful quote, they all stopped talking, stared at me and then, as a group shuffled away to the back of the room.

Immediately my suspicious journalist brain lit up with ‘what were they talking about that they thought I’d overheard?’. It was probably nothing, but for the next few weeks I couldn’t shake that idea from my head, that if something was going on, what would they do to stop me from printing what they thought I’d overheard?

There would have been a lot of ways to do that without going to the extremes of what happens to Dan, the reporter in A Deadly Rejection, but I’ve always been somewhat over-dramatic about this type of thing – a good skill for a crime writer to have, don’t you think?

I can’t recall the moment I sat down to write the book, but it probably began to emerge over the next few weeks. It seems strange to look back now, when the book has been edited and changed so much, and think that without that one moment, that one reaction to a journalist, A Deadly Rejection might not have happened.

The book took over my life for many an evening, weekend, holiday for years but finally I’ve got it onto the virtual bookshelves and readers are enjoying it (most importantly).

I thank those councillors and officers for the inspiration. I promise that none of them is in the finished book, nor is the innovation panel. After all, who would believe that such a thing existed? You couldn’t make it up.

~~~~~

You can read Lynne’s first guest post about her writing journey here https://aloverofbooks.wordpress.com/2018/01/31/lynne-milfords-monthly-guest-post/

 

Book Blurb

How far would you go to get what you want?

Beneath the bustling, respectable exterior of the Kent town of Allensbury lies a world of corruption and greed.

When local news reporter Dan Sullivan scents a story in the local council, he begins to ask questions. But when his source dies in mysterious circumstances, Dan is implicated. He is quickly drawn into a world of lies, ambition and avarice as he fights to clear his name.

The more he digs, the more someone tries to stop the story from ever seeing the light of day.

Dan must decide what’s more important to him…the story, or his life.

 

Links

Book shortlink to Amazon http://ow.ly/57IG30fS5F5

Long link UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deadly-Rejection-would-what-want-ebook/dp/B0768WP1SB/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1507972626&sr=8-1&keywords=a+deadly+rejection

LM Milford’s blog – http://www.lmmilford.wordpress.com/

Twitter – @lmmilford

 

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ by Pankaj Giri

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ was self-published as an eBook by Pankaj Giri last November. Pankaj contacted me a while back to ask if I would review his novel. I would like to thank him both for sending me a copy of his book and for being really patient with me. I meant to review it much earlier but things got in the way.

It’s the autumn of 2012 and two people are about to find their lives totally turned upside down.

Still haunted by losing his brother at a young age, Soham has managed to establish a promising career in IT for himself in Bangalore. Fiona, after having had a difficult childhood, finds her life is finally taking a turn for the better. She has married her beloved and things are wonderful.

But when tragedy strikes them both yet again, their fundamentally fragile lives threaten to fall apart. Can Fiona and Soham overcome their grief and find some normality again?

I absolutely adored this book from start to finish. I found myself really wanting to savour it and so I took my time reading it. The writing was simply exquisite and the descriptions were just wonderful. Pankaj Giri has clearly given a lot of thought to this story.

The chapters are narrated by Sharon (Fiona’s mother), Fiona and Soham. The reader is given a good insight into their lives leading up to the individual tragedies. I warmed to the main characters instantly. I felt really bad for Soham who put himself through hell for years after his brother’s death.

It was really interesting learning about the different traditions; i.e. the festivals and what happens at funerals. I loved the description of the birch tree, how it loses all of its leaves year after year and yet it continues to stand there patiently. It waits for new leaves to grow and doesn’t give up hope. If only we could all be that patient and positive. This book really got me thinking and made me realise how short life really is and how you should make use of it. Material things are of course nice but loved ones are all the more important.

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ is a thought-provoking and emotional story about love and loss and how there can still be hope even in the darkest of moments. It gives a very strong message not to give up no matter what.

I really hope that Pankaj Giri writes more books. To not do so would surely be torture for his readers. I don’t normally compare authors with others, but I would say if you like Renita D’Silva’s books then you will hopefully enjoy this one.

I give this book 5 out of 5.

~~~~~

‘The Fragile Thread of Hope’ can be purchased from:-

Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fragile-Thread-Hope-emotional-inspirational-ebook/dp/B076ZGGNH8/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076ZGGNH8

 

Author Links

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/PankajGiriAuthor/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/_PankajGiri

 

Cover Reveal – ‘Abel’s Revenge’ by Ross Greenwood

This is such an exciting day.  You might be wondering why and the reason is this.  ‘Abel’s Revenge’ is Ross Greenwood’s brand new book and it is being published as an eBook on the 25th March 2018.  Today, along with a number of other bloggers I am helping to reveal the cover and I can tell you now that it is fab.

So, are you ready to see the cover?  I won’t keep you waiting any longer.  Feast your eyes on this little beauty…..

 

Book Blurb

This is a story about a city. As with all others, it’s a place of violence. There are murderers, and they live among us.

This is also a tale about a couple — sometimes friends, occasionally lovers, but always partners. Dan and Olivia are fighting modern battles; the ones parents have over a lack of money, time or peace.

An escalating serial killer terrifies the streets and homes. The body count rises as their relationship crumbles. Society reveals its dark side, and no one is safe. Dan and Olivia experience this first-hand as danger closes in.

Will Abel’s reign of terror ever end?

Who will live and who will die?

~~~~~

‘Abel’s Revenge’ can be pre-ordered from:-

Amazon UK – http://bit.ly/AbelsRevenge-RossGreenwood-AmazonUK

Amazon US – http://bit.ly/AbelsRevenge-RossGreenwood-AmazonUS

 

About Ross Greenwood

Ross Greenwood was born in 1973 in Peterborough and lived there until he was 20, attending The King’s School in the city. He then began a rather nomadic existence, living and working all over the country and various parts of the world.

Ross found himself returning to Peterborough many times over the years, usually, so he says “when things had gone wrong.” It was on one of these occasions that he met his partner about 100 metres from his back door whilst walking a dog. Two children swiftly followed. And, according to Ross, he is “still a little stunned by the pace of it now.”

Lazy Blood book was started a long time ago but parenthood and then four years as a prison officer got in the way. Ironically it was the four a.m. feed which gave the author the opportunity to finish the book as unable to get back to sleep he completed it in the early morning hours.

Ross Greenwood’s second book, The Boy Inside, was picked up by Bloodhound Books, and in September 2017, Fifty Years of Fear was published. All his books are thought provoking, and told with a sense of humour.

Ross Greenwood hopes you enjoy reading them.

 

Author Links

Website – www.rossgreenwoodauthor.com

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/RossGreenwoodAuthor/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/greenwoodross

 

Other Books by Ross Greenwood

Lazy Blood (Sept. 2016) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2pqxLfo
The Boy Inside (Febr 2017) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2uuGWRQ
Fifty Years of Fear (Sept.2017) – Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2DY1TWB

~~~~~

Blog Tour

There will be a blog tour starting on publication day which has been organised by the wonderful Caroline Vincent of Bits about Books.

Guest Post by Glenn McGoldrick

Gleen McGoldrick is a writer of short stories.  Today Glenn is on my blog with his very own story which I hope you enjoy reading.

 

My Story

Where to start? I liked writing as a kid. Yep. My stories at primary school. Tiger Man was one of them. I wrote and wrote, page after page. Can’t remember any of the story at all. I was probably around 7 years old. I just had the main character, Tiger Man. Total crap.

I won some kind of prize for it. Notepad? Jelly babies? Gold star? Something.

At secondary school I was The Man in English class; won the yearly prize plenty of times. I could spell. I was Mr Coleman’s favourite, when I wasn’t being a little bastard in class.

And I was a reader too. Oh, yes. I liked reading so much that I stole a nice collection from Mr Coleman’s shelves. All the classics, in really attractive covers. There were about ten copies of each book, so he didn’t really notice me skimming a book every couple of days.

And I was a reader. What did I read? Stephen King. Yeah, horror mostly; during my teens, I loved it. Westerns, too.

I kept a diary for a few years too. Found it helpful to write stuff down. But I stopped, in my early 20s. With my mother helping me, I tore up all my diaries, chucked them in the bin. Why? It felt like I was letting go. Of what? Moving on? From what? It felt therapeutic.

Now I have my writing ‘sessions’. Something bothers me, then I write about it, pages, free flow, let it rip. It’s personal, a conversation with me – that’s what I tell myself.

It’s a confessional, a chance to just get it all out, no editor, no censor, just throw it onto the page. Sometimes I’m scared of where it takes me.

Sometimes it takes me to dark places, upsetting places. Painful. Yeah. Sometimes. But I usually feel better afterwards. Lighter. Clearer of mind.

When did I start writing fiction? I had the idea in 2012. Read a ‘How To’ book and thought, this is something I can do.

I enrolled on a course: Creative Writing Flying Start. Different assignments and exercises. The last assignment was to write a story. So I wrote my first story. It was OK, good marks.

I moved to Argentina. I wrote some stories, but didn’t get much done, as my head was coming apart. Thousands of miles from home, and I just didn’t want to be there. I didn’t really want to be with the woman I was with, but I struggled to just say it.

I just kept it to myself, growing more miserable each day, drinking more. I’d sit in the garden until long after midnight, drinking, thinking about my family back home, staring at the tall trees in a neighbour’s garden. I looked into the dark tree tops silhouetted by moonlight, seeing strange shapes, big cats, snipers taking aim at me; I was just hoping to see the faces of friends.

Eventually it all went to hell, and I came home broken and confused. I didn’t know if I’d see her again, how big I’d screwed up, or what was coming next. A week later my mother died.

So, as well as seeing a therapist for depression, I started another writing course with Writer’s College. Somehow I got plenty of work done. How did I focus? Jesus. I don’t know.

But I got work done, happy to have something to throw myself into, and my marks were good. Eventually I started dating again, and felt a lot better about things.

Why writing? Short stories for now. It’s hard at times. Need discipline. Just sit down and write. Never mind the laundry, or making a curry, or going for a bike ride – sit your ass down and write. There’ll always be other stuff to do, so get to it after you write.

And criticism? Yeah, it sucks. I paid for critiques from a professional. Some of them got to me. Not his fault; it just hurt.

You’ve been working on something for a week or two, develop it, get it down, finish it off, sit back and think about how good it is. Then a stranger shows you all the holes in it and you think, Bloody hell! He’s right. It’s not so great.

So, initially it was rough, facing criticism of a story that I’d put a lot of work into. But I toughened up.

I can’t expect every story to be a success, every story to sell. If it does well, then great; if it doesn’t, then too bad. I just get the hell on with the next one.

I pay attention to all the critiques I receive, and try to take all the criticism constructively. If I don’t get too ruffled by some negative remarks, then I see it as a chance to improve, hopefully getting a little better with each story.

And when a story is accepted, it’s great. Relief. Joy. Satisfaction. Validation. I can do this. Show me the money.

So I’ve had some successes, sold some stories, won a competition or two. I’ve had plenty of rejections and disappointments too. So what. It’s all part of the game.

I published a collection of some of my stories on Amazon Kindle. Researched for a couple of months, did all the work, even the cover photo. I wanted to be able to say that I’d done absolutely every part of the process myself. It turned out quite well, I think; it was stressful at times, but very rewarding, and it’s great to see my book on Amazon.

I promote the book on social media, and I’m trying to spread the word, get reviews, all that jazz. I’ve sold some books already, but it’s not enough. It’s never enough.

But, to me, there’s no hurry. The sales will pick up, I think, as I learn how to better promote my work, and until then, well – I’ll just get the hell on with the next story.

 

About Glenn McGoldrick

I worked in land-based casinos for five years, living and working in such diverse places as Luton, Israel, Greece and Middlesbrough!

In 1996 I started to work on cruise ships, then travelled the world for the next 15 years. I saw many wonderful places, had some great times and met some real characters.

I finished working on cruise ships in 2011, and since then I’ve settled in England, making my home in the North East. Life is good, but I still miss a little bit of scuba diving…

 

Links

Website:       http://www.glennmcgoldrick.com/

Kindle:         http://amzn.to/2p1vU0k

Paperback:    http://amzn.to/2pddBFA

Twitter:         @G_T_McGoldrick

Facebook:      Glenn McGoldrick

Goodreads:    http://bit.ly/2pLDbES

 

Guest Post by Wendy Janes

Book Cover

‘What Jennifer Knows’ is Wendy Janes’ first solo novel which she recently self-published.  Wendy has written a guest post for my blog.

 

From Enid Blyton to Anne Tyler by Wendy Janes

I was one of those children who would always be found reading a book. I loved Enid Blyton, and then progressed to Helen Dore Boylston’s series about a nurse named Sue Barton. An obsessive devouring of Agatha Christie followed. My reading tastes may not have been adventurous, but you couldn’t fault my enthusiasm for the written word.

Each weekend I’d spend my pocket money on paperbacks in WH Smith, return piles of books to our local library and gather another armful to take home. I must have stood for hours in front of bookshelves, head tilted to one side, reading titles on spines, plucking a book from the shelf to admire a cover and read a blurb. Making the right choice was very important because these books would be my companions for the next few weeks, some staying with me for much longer. Adventures and mysteries entertained me into my early teens, although Alice in Wonderland gave me nightmares.

During my late teens, with school exams in English literature looming, my reading choices were influenced by the curriculum. Luckily I loved classic English authors such as Graham Greene, George Orwell, E.M. Forster and Jane Austen. Perfectly crafting their words down to the last syllable, these people could write!

In addition to those books from school, I found others at the library. I discovered F. Scott Fitzgerald. He took me to the 1920s, where I would dance and drink champagne while falling in and out of love.

My regular trips to bookshops and libraries continued through teacher training, numerous office jobs, marriage and children. Searching for stories that reflected my own experience, and tales that took me abroad and to other times, I was attracted by contemporary women’s fiction, literary fiction, and what came to be known as chick lit.

I spent many satisfying hours in the company of Maeve Binchy, Helen Fielding, Kazuo Ishiguro, Maggie O’Farrell, Vikram Seth, Carole Ann Shields, Anne Tyler and many other gifted writers. I didn’t realise it at the time, but they were teaching me how to write, how to craft a story, develop a character, hone a sentence that touches someone’s heart.

I’ve always sought education, solace and enjoyment from the books I’ve read, although since becoming a proofreader, I admit I’ve become more critical of the books I read for pleasure. Often I have to remind myself to stop actively looking for typos and inconsistencies. Now that I review books and write stories myself, I’ve become more analytical, which unfortunately has diminished some of the natural joy of reading. However, when I find a sentence, a paragraph, a chapter or a book that transports me, it’s still a wonderful treat and possibly even more precious.

I do not have any pretensions that I will ever write as beautifully as the very best authors who have kept me company over the last decades, but I look upon all my years of reading as a vital element of my apprenticeship in writing.

Now I’ve published a novel and some of my short stories, my apprenticeship continues. I hope it never ends.

 

About Wendy Janes

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Wendy Janes spends her time running her freelance proofreading business, writing novels and short stories, and volunteering for The National Autistic Society’s Education Rights Service. She has recently published her first solo novel, What Jennifer Knows. You can connect with Wendy online and discover more about her writing via Twitter, her Facebook author page, Goodreads Author page and Amazon author pages (UK/US).

Guest Post by John Raynor

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John S. Raynor is a blind writer based in Cheshire who has achieved a lot and who I already admire very much.  He has very kindly provided me with a guest post for my blog which I hope you enjoy reading.

 

The snail’s pace path to publication

Like you, I am also a lover of books.  After losing my sight in the late seventies, I read nothing for over thirty years.  In 2011, I registered with the RNIB’s Talking Book service and bought myself a specialised MP3 player on which I could read many of the superb books available.  Since then, I have read about forty books each year and can not imagine life without a book to read.

I also enjoy crime, thrillers and supernatural themes.  My favourite authors are Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Tom Clancy, Harlan Coben, Tess Gerritsen, Dan Brown, Lee Child and James Herbert.

I started writing in the early seventies using speech synthesis and, more recently, screen reading software on my computer.  I have self-published two novels, two autobiographical works and three children’s short stories.

Recently I have completed a thriller and, after an editorial analysis from Cornerstones Literary Consultants, I am currently modifying the text to make it more presentable to a Literary Agency.  It is so difficult to be accepted by a recognised Agency/publisher these days, but I am hopeful that I can join the ranks of the “Published authors”.

I totally agree with Tim Baker about research.  I have carried out extensive research, with the aid of the Internet, for all my works in an effort to make the plots more plausible.  I notice that Tim has an interest in Guide dogs.  Although I do not have one myself, I have had a great deal of experience with them over many years and have actually included Elsa, a German Shepherd guide dog in this latest work, titled “See All Evil”.

 

You can visit John Raynor’s website at www.jsraynor.co.uk

Twitter – @J_S_Raynor

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